2011

Lead on Purpose

Leadership is a relationship

Lead on Purpose

Merriam-Webster’s dictionary lists several definitions for the word relationship. The term is generally used to denote family ties, but it’s also used as a state of connecting or binding participants. Actions that bring people together and bind them in a common cause are key to building effective relationships. I was first introduced to the statement ‘leadership is a relationship’ in the book The Leadership Challenge by James Kouzes and Barry Posner.

Trust and Job Satisfaction

Lead on Purpose

One of the most important keys to leading a team is creating an environment of trust. Merriam-Webster defines trust as an “assured reliance on the character, ability, strength or truth of someone or something.” To work successfully as a team, the leader must create a culture where people can rely on the strength and abilities of those they work with and believe in their leader’s direction and vision. Why is trust important to job satisfaction?

Trending Sources

Lean startup, lean company

Lead on Purpose

“I explained the theory of the Lean Startup, repeating my definition: an organization designed to create new products and services under conditions of extreme uncertainty.” This definition comes from Eric Ries, author of The Lean Startup: How Today’s Entrepreneurs Use Continuous Innovation to Create Radically Successful Businesses. As the title indicates, the book’s content is geared towards people starting new businesses.

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Guest Post: How non-leaders can lead

Lead on Purpose

By Peter Davey. John C Maxwell defined leadership when he said, “The true measure of leadership is influence, nothing more and nothing less.” Maxwell has correctly identified that leadership is not just about traits, position, personality and experience; it’s more about having an ability to influence people by maintaining integrity and trustworthiness.

Tenacity in 2012

Lead on Purpose

Successful people share several common traits; tenacity is at the top. Merriam-Webster defines tenacious as “persistent in maintaining, adhering to, or seeking something valued or desired.” Think about your favorite athlete, actor, business leader, or other successful person and you’re sure to find tenacity as one of their defining characteristics. Tenacity fuels persistence. Persistence is analogous to running a marathon.

Guest Post: Begging For Leadership Won’t Get You A Pocket Full of Change

Lead on Purpose

By Kaity Nakagoshi. Change is inevitable and so is the resistance to change. People are often not welcoming of change unless it is implemented by leadership correctly. It’s natural that people become complacent with the status quo and perform rote tasks without giving their actions much thought. Change brings about fear of the unknown, which creates an atmosphere of unnecessary anxiety.

Enduring success

Lead on Purpose

One of the key traits of great leaders is their ability to move forward despite the difficulties they face. They not only find ways for their own progress, but also find ways to help others along the way. Enduring success happens over time, bit by bit, day by day. The true definition of success is duration. Finding the will and the inner strength to keep going is crucial to progress.

Book Review: The Coming Jobs War

Lead on Purpose

“If you were to ask me ‘From all your research, what is the best predictor of new jobs?’ my answer would always be new customers.” Jim Clifton , chairman of Gallup and author of The Coming Jobs War: What every leader must know about the future of job creation , says that what everyone wants is a good job. He makes the bold assertion that job creation and successful entrepreneurship are the world’s most pressing issues right now. “If

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Product leadership

Lead on Purpose

The position of Product Manager is the single most important individual contributor role at any technology (product-focused) company. I understand that many of you may not agree with my statement (I invite you to leave a comment and make your case for a more important position). The reason I make such a bold statement is this: If the product manager succeeds, the product succeeds. If the product team succeeds, the product line(s) will make money and the company will succeed.

Book Review: The 1% Solution

Lead on Purpose

“The average difference between the gold medal winner and fourth place is just 1 percent.” In any type of competition the margin of victory is slim, and it can seem overwhelming to even try to compete. The key premise in The 1% Solution: How to Make Your Next 30 Days the Best Ever is that while not everyone can be great, everyone can be better than they are right now. While you may never be 100% better than all the others, you can be 1% better at hundreds of things.

Guest Post: How to Encourage Your Team Members to Stand Up and Lead

Lead on Purpose

By Andrea Gordon. To be successful in today’s market, team members need to step up and be ready to take a leadership role. It is not easy to develop leadership skills in others, however, so it’s very important to understand that some people do not share your goals and aspirations. Keep an open mind and learn to use varied techniques to inspire different team members to stand up and lead. . 1. Challenge – Issue a challenge. (In

Leadership lessons from the mountain

Lead on Purpose

I had the opportunity recently to go up to Sundance , a local ski resort, to go mountain biking with my team. This is the type of mountain biking where you ride up a ski lift and bike down one of many trails to the bottom, load up and do it again. The mountains are absolutely beautiful this time of year and the weather could not have been better. The great thing about activities like mountain biking is they give you a chance to get away and help you put life into perspective.

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Five rules for executive product leadership

Lead on Purpose

The original idea for starting Lead on Purpose was a recognition that product managers have the need to lead (inspire, motivate, guide) people who do not report them. Their success depends, to a large extent, on people in other parts of the organization. The PMs who take a leadership approach to their job have the most success. The leadership role of the product team (PM, PO, PMM, UX) is critical to the success of any organization.

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Communicating product vision

Lead on Purpose

Communication has changed significantly in the past several years. Twitter, Facebook and other social media have driven personal interaction to short, succinct statements that force us to be brief and to the point. One of my colleagues on the engineering team recently told me “if you can’t write your spec in 140 characters, I can’t implement it.” Though I’m sure he said it in jest, he got me to thinking about effective communication.

Sharing the success

Lead on Purpose

The word “sharing” is one you won’t find used very often in business. Competition has increased in every market and those who succeed have to spend time, money and effort to win. And winning itself has become the end game for too many people. There’s nothing wrong with winning, and if you go into business (or anything for that matter), you need to focus on succeeding. However, success at all costs is not worth the price.

Recognizing opportunities

Lead on Purpose

The old saying goes “opportunities are all around us.” There are times when that statement is true for all of us, but the opportunities usually are not apparent. Opportunities come in different ways. Some are easy to spot and gladly accepted (getting that promotion at work). But more often opportunities are obscure and usually difficult to perceive as providing benefit. If the old saying is true, how do you spot opportunities?

Book Review: 15 Minutes Including Q&A

Lead on Purpose

“Most business presentations stink. Really Stink. They stink in a way that drains souls.” That’s the mantra by which Joey Asher operates, and he wrote the book 15 Minutes Including Q&A: A Plan to Save the World from Lousy Presentations to help solve the problem. From now on, all presentations should be no longer than 15 minutes. Half of the time is for the prepared message; the other half is for Q&A.

Creating value in 2011

Lead on Purpose

Every New Year brings new opportunities. Something about turning over the calendar causes people to take a hard look at what they can do to improve on their current situation. Ultimately, we all want to create more value — for ourselves, for the organizations we associate with and for the people we care about. The word value has many meanings. The one most applicable to this discussion is “relative worth, merit or importance.” The more we improve in these areas, the more value we create.

ProductCamp Utah

Lead on Purpose

Holding user conferences is one of the great pastimes of organizations far and wide. In the technology world, conferences have grown into huge events that attract thousands of participants and occupy massive convention centers.

Guest Post: Three Ways to Increase Trust and Eliminate Drama

Lead on Purpose

By Marlene Chism. You ask your employees to engage, but they sit there with their arms crossed. You solicit ideas, but no one comes forward. No one seems to know exactly what is expected and everyone seems to pass the buck. If you see any of these drama indicators, it’s likely that there is a trust issue in your workplace. Stephen M.R.

On-boarding Product Managers

Lead on Purpose

A few days back Jim Holland and I had an engaging conversation about on-boarding product managers. We concluded that product leaders too often leave this important task to the HR team and miss important opportunities to strengthen relationships and build their teams.

Confidence—key to success

Lead on Purpose

Confidence is one of those things that ebbs and flows. Some people have it, some more and others less. It’s even defined differently by different people. Regardless of how you define it, confidence leads to success. A recent experience caused me to think about my own confidence level. I realized it had been ebbing. I spent time reflecting and made a few changes that helped significantly. I learned a lot through the process.

It’s the people

Lead on Purpose

Everybody knows it, and yet too many executives, VPs, managers or other so-called “leaders” seem to forget: it’s the people that make the organization successful. It’s too easy to focus on the products or the projects and lose track of the people who are doing the work. Here are three quick tests you can take to determine whether, for you as a leader, it’s really about your people: Commitment to the organization: Why do your team members work for your organization? Do they believe your vision?

Guest Post: A Leader’s Perspective on Failure

Lead on Purpose

By Tim Eyre. Our culture has become increasingly obsessed with perfection. You see it everywhere. It’s pervasive in the entertainment industry, as depictions of celebrities contribute to an unattainable idea of what beauty really is. It also permeates the culture of higher education, as applicants vying for spots in prestigious graduate business programs are often made to feel that an A- in Economics 101 might as well have been an F.

Leading with Character by Leading from Within

C-Level Strategies

There is no escaping the fact that when we show up for work and for our leadership roles, we bring the entirety of ourselves to the table.

The Introvert’s Guide to Getting Noticed in Business

C-Level Strategies

If there is one area where I think extraverts actually do have a leg-up on introverts in business it’s this: they are much more comfortable being visible and attracting attention.

4 Ways to Use Your Blog to Land a New Job or Client

C-Level Strategies

By Lisa Petrilli. Assuming that your blog is a genuine reflection of who you are personally and professionally, it can be a valuable tool when seeking a new position or the opportunity to work with a new client

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Leadership & Influence

N2Growth Blog

By Mike Myatt , Chief Strategy Officer, N2growth. You cannot be a effective leader without influence. Let me make this as simple as I can – if you’re a leader, influence needs to be a competency.

Innovation Creates Uncertainty

Leading Blog

We don’t like uncertainty. It’s not comfortable. We want innovation. We like creativity. It’s engaging. But innovation creates uncertainty. So while we say we want creativity and innovation we often reject it because it is new, different and risky.

How to Discover Your True Path in Life

C-Level Strategies

We were all moved, and many of us shaken, by the loss of Steve Jobs last week. He inspired us with his vision, his passion for his work and his creative genius. We cheered him when he battled back from being fired at Apple.

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Gratitude in Leadership: When Gratefulness Fuels Giving

C-Level Strategies

My first real experience with leadership was in college when I was named Vice-President of the Indiana University Student Foundation , the largest student foundation in the country.

The Top 10 Things Leaders Should Hear From Their Teammates

Terry Starbucker

All leaders need to get good and consistent verbal feedback from their teammates, but there are what I consider to be the “Golden 10″ pieces of feedback that we really need to be getting to ratify our effectiveness (and our approach to greatness).

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The Accidental Leader Who Changes the World

C-Level Strategies

Today is President’s Day, a day in which I always reflect back on the birth of our country. I know I’ve mentioned it before but I was born in Boston and spent my early years there, with many a weekend or summer day spent exploring the Freedom Trail.

Leadership, Vision and a New Birth of Freedom

C-Level Strategies

In my recent post entitled, “ Leadership Guiding Principles of a Successful CEO ,&# I shared with you how one very successful CEO makes the book, “ Lincoln on Leadership: Executive Strategies for Tough Times &# required reading for every member of his Leadership Development Team.

7 Random Pieces of Advice for the Younger Leader

Ron Edmondson

I love working with younger leaders. It keeps me young and it helps to know I’m investing in something and someone who will likely last beyond my lifetime. I want to share some things I’ve learned from experience. Some of it hard experiences.

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Leading Gen Y: the Secrets Every Leader Must Learn

C-Level Strategies

I am extremely fortunate to be able to call Greg Hartle a friend. I met him on Twitter when he began participating in Leadership Chat , sharing genuinely insightful tidbits of wisdom in 140 characters; wisdom that seemed beyond his years.

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Leaders Share Their Biggest “Follower Challenges”

C-Level Strategies

February 2, 2011 by Lisa Petrilli. Last night's #LeadershipChat on Twitter revolved around the topic of The Difficult Follower and how to lead them. Toward the end of the evening I asked the LeadershipChat community, “As leaders

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19 Revealing CEO Leadership Quotes

C-Level Strategies

Yesterday I shared with you 10 Insightful Social Media Quotes from Smart CEOs , which were reflective of the social media conversation that we had at our most recent CEO Connection event in New York City.

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3 Ways to Be a Positive Leader

Leading Blog

This is a guest post by best-selling author and speaker, Jon Gordon about the value of developing positive relationships with the people you lead.

12 Killers of Good Leadership

Ron Edmondson