Why Is Innovation So Often Synonymous With Disappointment?

Harvard Business Review

The best project managers, he writes, have a "magical" impact; companies need to do a better job of supporting and encouraging them. Gary Hamel will explore how companies build their innovation engines.

Why Is Innovation So Often Synonymous With Disappointment?

Harvard Business Review

The best project managers, he writes, have a “magical” impact; companies need to do a better job of supporting and encouraging them. Josh Lerner of Harvard Business School urges companies to look beyond the usual R&D approach to consider becoming corporate venture capitalists themselves, a point he expands on in his article “Corporate Venturing” in the October 2013 issue of HBR. Gary Hamel will explore how companies build their innovation engines.

How to Reward Your Stellar Team

Harvard Business Review

Teams like to be seen as part of a project that contributes at a high level," Ancona says. Instead, praise the behaviors that contribute to the team''s overall success such as chipping in on others'' projects and giving candid peer feedback.

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How CIOs Can Change the Game

Harvard Business Review

It was an enlightening conversation with business strategy guru Gary Hamel , Newport News Shipbuilding''s CIO Leni Kaufman , and Walgreens'' CIO Tim Theriault, with HBR editor Angelia Herrin moderating. Talk about the goals of the company, the growth plan, the projection it''s on, how you''re going to improve profitability, talk about what the government is funding, what''s happening with sequestration. asked Gary Hamel.

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Hierarchy Is Overrated

Harvard Business Review

All decision-making is done through self-managing teams of 8-12 people: hiring, pay, which projects to work on, everything. There is a growing body of evidence that shows that organizations with flat structures outperform those with more traditional hierarchies in most situations (see the work of Gary Hamel for a good summary of these results). Maybe you’ve heard the old cliché – if you’ve got “too many chiefs,” your initiative will fail.

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