3 Ways to Improve Your Organization’s Culture

CO2

by Calvin Guyer We have all heard the phrase “Culture eats strategy for lunch (or breakfast, or dinner).” ” But what exactly does it mean and what, as a business leader, can you do to improve your organization’s culture? That culture can help and it can hurt.

Corporations: Donate Your Skills, Not Just Your Money

Harvard Business Review

What is it that makes a corporate citizenship program most effective in terms of employee satisfaction and community impact? Furthermore, we learned that this mode of giving delivers a greater impact to the community because it helps fill critical capability gaps in nonprofits.

How a Bathtub-Shaped Graph Helped a Company Avoid Disaster

Harvard Business Review

Caught up in administrative activities such as managing employee records and planning company picnics, human resources departments can too easily lose sight of their primary function: Making sure the organization has the needed human capital to implement its strategy. It was U-shaped.

CIOs Must Lead Outside of IT

Harvard Business Review

The CIO paradox is a set of contradictions that lies at the heart of IT leadership. Many CIOs have buckled under the CIO paradox, while others have managed to be effective despite it. Most large companies have underinvested in IT for decades. Reach beyond IT.

CIO 16

How to Compete When IT Is Abundant

Harvard Business Review

"You only gain an edge over rivals by having or doing something that they can''t have or do," wrote Nicholas Carr ten years ago in his controversial HBR article, " IT Doesn''t Matter.". When "the core functions of IT — data storage, data processing, and data transport — have become available and affordable to all," he wrote, IT would cease to be a source of competitive advantage. We are moving abruptly from an era of IT scarcity to one of abundance.

Google’s Strategy vs. Glass’s Potential

Harvard Business Review

As Quartz reported last year: Members of the Glass operations team have been on the road showing it off to companies and organizations, and they told Quartz that some of the most enthusiastic responses have come from manufacturers, teachers, medical companies, and hospitals.

How Microsoft Avoided the Peter Principle with Nadella

Harvard Business Review

For finishers, he will have to change its treads—redirect its strategy—while barreling down a highway with no map for what lies ahead. It is a “jump shift,” as Procter & Gamble chairman A.G. Lafley has described it. Prior jobs cannot totally prepare one for the elevated reality, especially when it now requires running the whole show. Or consider managed-health care provider Humana’s decision in 2013 to recruit an outsider as its next chief executive.

CEO 12