Learning the Wrong Lesson

Leading Blog

In What You''re Really Meant to Do , Robert Kaplan tells the story of a television producer that got passed over for a promotion. You undermine your "ability to exhibit character and leadership traits" that could help your career, says Kaplan. Injustices happen.

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Fear Your Strengths: A book review by Bob Morris

First Friday Book Synopsis

Fear Your Strengths: What You Are Best at Could Be Your Biggest Problem Robert Kaplan and Robert Kaiser Berrett-Koehler Publishers (2013) Actually, what we should fear are complacency and self-satisfaction as well as the assumption that “just good enough” really is.

Five Strategies for Nonprofit Innovation

LDRLB

I put the word profit in quotes because New York-based Housing Works, which manages to do everything I just described, is technically a charity operation. Innovation business model innovation kaplan nonprofit Nonprofits face a fundamental “business” challenge: they’re “nonprofits.”

Intelligent Redesign of Health Care

Harvard Business Review

Kaplan and Michael E. The results are often surprising; for example in the pilot project described in Kaplan’s and Porter’s 2011 HBR article , one finding was that most providers’ existing cost systems underestimate the cost of new patient evaluation services by 15% to 20%.

Don't Wait for Change

Harvard Business Review

Offering not much more than the chance to make a difference (and travel expenses) his line up eventually included Fast-Company Founder Bill Taylor ; Saul Kaplan , who runs the Business Innovation Factory in Providence; Whitney Johnson , founding partner of Rose Park Advisors; Lara Lee, the Chief Innovation and Operating Officer of Continuum; and a dozen others (including me). You probably can think of something in your company that should change.

Reflecting on David Garvin’s Imprint on Management

Harvard Business Review

Kaplan’s balanced scorecard or Clayton Christensen’s disruptive innovation. I’ll fast-forward through the next decade, when Garvin, trained in operations, helped to answer the question much of America was obsessed with at the time: How Japanese automakers could make higher-quality, more-reliable cars than Americans, while charging less for them. Managing organizations Managing people Operations Digital Article

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