Uniting the Religions of Process Improvement

Harvard Business Review

When they set out to turn around processes that have become woefully inefficient or ineffective, most companies choose one of four process improvement "religions": Lean , Six Sigma , Business Reengineering or Business Process Management (BPM). In addition, Lean converts have a predisposition against adopting large, centralized IT solutions, which may cause them to ignore useful approaches from the BPM religion. Brad Power is a consultant and researcher in process innovation.

How Cloud Computing Is Changing Management

Harvard Business Review

Client-server technology begat enterprise resource planning systems, and the consequent system-wide visibility that was required for what we call business process management (BPM). BPM reflected the interactions of different stakeholders, from product creation through supply chain to final assembly. The team of 20 people represented technology, infrastructure, production operations, development and information security parts of the business. yagi studio/Getty Images.

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Avoid the Improvement Hype Cycle

Harvard Business Review

Thus, today we have a number of process "religions": Statistical Process Control was followed by Total Quality Management, Business Reengineering, Six Sigma, Lean, and Business Process Management (BPM, which emphasizes process management software). To understand the strengths and weaknesses of different process religions, develop a network of people with experience in each one. Brad Power is a consultant and researcher in process innovation.