The Problems With Incubators, and How to Solve Them

Harvard Business Review

Inexperienced friends and family (and, increasingly, crowdsourced investors) lack the ability to gauge the viability of a business, or to mentor naïve entrepreneurs. This knowledge gap, I have come to believe, is best filled by savvy incubators. The first business incubator in the U.S.

When Big Companies Support Start-ups, Both Make More Money

Harvard Business Review

In the technology world, we’ve seen the tremendous impact that eBay has made in helping small e-commerce businesses get off the ground. Now imagine if eBay went beyond providing a technology platform and entered the field of business incubation in a meaningful way, It’s an idea that could have a huge impact. In the start-up world, there’s a big focus on business incubators such as YCombinator–perhaps too much focus.

How the U.S. Can Rebuild Its Capacity to Innovate

Harvard Business Review

has lost what Harvard Business School’s Willy Shih calls the “ industrial commons ”: indispensable production skills and capabilities. For good reason: these firms are diverse, resilient, and geographically distributed engines of innovation.

Morning Advantage: Three Ways the U.S. Election Could Get Ugly

Harvard Business Review

The city of Wuxi in Eastern China has launched a high-profile, high-tech business incubator to lure back Chinese brainiacs who’ve gone abroad to study and work in science and engineering. But there’s one snag: the business climate in China is not exactly conducive to supporting the relatively high failure-rates of new ventures. “If Finally — after years of campaigning, the U.S. presidential election will be decided today. Unless, of course. it isn’t.

The Core Incompetencies of the Corporation

Harvard Business Review

Imagine, if you will, a car engine so woefully inefficient that only 13% of the gas it consumes actually combusts. Most of the recommended remedies—idea wikis, business incubators, online collaboration, design thinking, “authentic” leadership, et al —are no more than minor tweaks. Large organizations of all types suffer from an assortment of congenital disabilities that no amount of incremental therapy can cure. First, they are inertial.

Getting Buy-In for Innovation that Doesn’t Fade at the End of the Quarter

Harvard Business Review

You’ve prepared a business plan for a promising new entrepreneurial venture. You’ve got funding and the blessing of your CEO and Board to go ahead with this high-profile “experiment” Your venture could be a growth engine for your corporation’s otherwise large but slow and steady core business.