Sat.Mar 23, 2019

6 Questions to Ask Before Picking a Point of Sale Software

Women on Business

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3 Things That You Should Consider Outsourcing

Strategy Driven

As a business owner, there are many decisions that you have to make, and one of them is whether you outsource or not.

Must-Read Book For Nonprofit Leaders

Eric Jacobson

If you lead a nonprofit organization, the one hour it will take you to read Peter F. Drucker's book called, The Five Most Important Questions You Will Ever Ask About Your Organization , will be well worth it. This book may fundamentally change the way you work and lead your organization. Perhaps one of most challenging questions Drucker asks the reader is: " Do we produce results that are sufficiently outstanding for us to justify putting our resources in this area ?

Decision-Making Warning Flag 1a – The Gambler’s Fallacy

Strategy Driven

“The Gambler’s Fallacy, also known as the Monte Carlo Fallacy, is the false belief that the probability of an event in a random sequence is dependent on preceding events, its probability increasing with each successive occasion on which it fails to occur.”

How to handle employee poor hygiene at work

HR Digest

Organizations are sometimes faced with issues of employee poor hygiene at work. And ignoring this issue means taking on a deliberate risk. Poor employee hygiene has negative impacts on productivity and can reduce the overall workplace satisfaction among other employees. As an employer, the responsibility is yours to handle poor hygiene at work when it arises. However, you need respectful approaches to solve this issue.

Decision-Making Warning Flag 1b – Weak Analogies

Strategy Driven

“The fallacy of Weak analogy is committed when a conclusion is based on an insufficient, poor, or inadequate analogy. The analogy offered as evidence is faulty because it is irrelevant; the claimed similarity is superficial or unrelated to the issue at stake in the argument.

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