Virgin Atlantic Tested 3 Ways to Change Employee Behavior

Harvard Business

An estimated 21% of carbon emissions in the United States are attributable to companies, and yet to date there is scant research on how to make firm operations more efficient in terms of reducing pollution. So we partnered with Virgin Atlantic Airways on a field experiment to understand how the behavior of employees—in this case, airline captains—influences fuel efficiency, and how low-cost company interventions can influence their behavior.

Uber Shows How Not to Apply Behavioral Economics

Harvard Business

In a paper published in 2009 , Alex Haynes and colleagues examined the use and effectiveness of checklists in eight hospitals in eight cities in the Unites States. Another example I often give concerns the use of fuel- and carbon-efficient flight practices in the airline industry. All four groups increased their implementation of fuel-efficient behaviors. It’s a well-documented social-science finding called the Hawthorne effect.)