Structure Your Global Team for Innovation

Harvard Business Review

Many firms struggle to exploit the innovation potential of their global networks. That's partly because they manage global projects like traditional ones. To get the most from dispersed innovation, managers need a different playbook. Here are three ways to set up and manage global innovation for success: 1. Assign oversight and support responsibility to a senior manager. To ensure first mover advantage, the schedule was extremely aggressive.

Structure Your Global Team for Innovation

Harvard Business Review

Many firms struggle to exploit the innovation potential of their global networks. That's partly because they manage global projects like traditional ones. To get the most from dispersed innovation, managers need a different playbook. Here are three ways to set up and manage global innovation for success: 1. Assign oversight and support responsibility to a senior manager. To ensure first mover advantage, the schedule was extremely aggressive.

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A Survey of 3,000 Executives Reveals How Businesses Succeed with AI

Harvard Business

With the AI field recently picking up its pace of innovation after the decades-long “AI winter,” technical expertise and capabilities are in short supply. Compartmentalizing accountability for AI with functional leaders in IT, digital, or innovation can result in a hammer-in-search-of-a-nail outcome: technologies being launched without compelling use cases. There’s still time to make AI a competitive advantage. Photo by Aaron Burson.

What Investors Need to Know About Zimbabwe After Mugabe

Harvard Business

In this environment, multinationals that are willing to accept some risk and invest in the country could benefit from first-mover advantages – but only if the new administration follows through with much-needed economic reforms. Mnangagwa’s first actions in office underscore how important he views economic recovery. For example, after opening its first store in 2014, fast-food chain KFC recently opened its fifth branch in the country.

When to Change a Winning Strategy

Harvard Business Review

To succeed, therefore, managers have to learn when and how to abandon the strategies they have grown up with. Its story starts like many success stories do: An innovative concept coupled with a first-mover advantage, enabling a rapid physical expansion and generating increasing returns to scale. Pharmaceutical benefit managers (PBMs) were also growing in strength and aggressiveness. Companies tend to repeat what has worked for them in the past.

Five Myths of a CEO's First 100 Days

Harvard Business Review

Starting off on the right foot is crucial, especially during "the first 100 days," when new top executives are under intense scrutiny to prove they're equal to the job. In this spirit, the CEO-elect of an established media company devoted eight months prior to her accession to soliciting the views of stakeholders and identifying areas of future innovation and growth. Perhaps the most dangerous myth of all is that a new CEO's worth can be judged in the "first 100 days."

The Health Care Industry Needs to Start Taking Women Seriously

Harvard Business Review

Instead, according to new research from the Center for Talent Innovation (CTI), the fundamental issue is the health care industry’s failure to develop a nuanced understanding of, and commitment to, women as consumers and decision makers. The good news: By engaging this market segment and rebuilding trust, health care companies can have a first-mover advantage. What is the greatest impediment preventing Americans from getting good health care?