How Likely Is Your Industry to Be Disrupted? This 2×2 Matrix Will Tell You

Harvard Business

For the latter, we measured incumbents’ operational efficiency, commitment to innovation, and defenses against attack. But companies in this state often face increasing pressure to improve efficiency and reduce operating costs in their legacy businesses, and this pressure attracts opportunistic disruptors. Previously strong barriers to entry have perished; fixed assets such as car fleets, hotels, bank branches, and landline infrastructure have become weaknesses.

When a Country is Facing Political and Human Rights Issues, Should Businesses Leave or Stay?

Harvard Business

Questions like this involving issues like politics, human rights, or equality often present themselves sooner or later for any business operating in global markets. According to Reuters reporting , until a few years ago the bank operated in Sudan, a country whose government was under U.S. sanctions, that was also the reason why BNP Paribas continued operating in the East African nation: it made financial sense. Steve Bronstein/Getty Images.

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Recommended Resources – An Interview with Paul Leinwand and Cesare Mainardi, authors of The Essential Advantage

Strategy Driven

PL and CM: Most companies look outside to adjacent markets for growth and invest in assets to exploit those opportunities. And, invariably, you invest in assets. These choices historically conferred advantage – first-mover, scale – but asset-based scale advantages have diminished in recent years, thanks to technology, cheap information, and outsourcing. As the intrinsic value of assets diminishes, the competitive value of capabilities will only grow.

What It Takes to Be a Great Employer

Harvard Business Review

Even in the absence of a fixed definition, more than 100 studies have now demonstrated a strong relationship between employee engagement and organizational performance. For example, a Towers Perrin study conducted in 2007-2008 among 90,000 employees in 18 countries found that companies with the most engaged employees had a 19 percent increase in operating income during the previous year, while those with the lowest levels had a 32 percent decline.