Uniting the Religions of Process Improvement

First Friday Book Synopsis

Bob's blog entries "Black Belts" Brad Power Business Process Management (BPM) Chemical company Air Products four process improvement "religions" General Electric Harvard Business Review blog Harvard Business Review’s Daily Alerts Kaizen Lean Lean "senseis" Lean Enterprise Institute Michael Hammer Motorola Shell Oil Six Sigma the Toyota Production System Toyota Uniting the Religions of Process Improvement

Reflections on the Fabric of the Toyota Production System

Deming Institute

In either case, the extra effort (loss to the do-it-yourselfer ) is both finite and real, just as the use of hammers to assemble parts at the Ford plant were finite and real to Frank Pipp and his assembly team.

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Balancing Push and Pull Approaches to Improvement

Harvard Business Review

These mandated-from-above programs include Lean Six Sigma initiatives with experts (" Belts ") in command, big IT implementations, and reengineering of major end-to-end processes. An executive in the company's finance operations adopted a Six Sigma belt-driven approach to reduce costs in the company's global shared service centers. can often have a superior attitude and be zealots with a hammer, so that everything looks like a nail.

Uniting the Religions of Process Improvement

Harvard Business Review

When they set out to turn around processes that have become woefully inefficient or ineffective, most companies choose one of four process improvement "religions": Lean , Six Sigma , Business Reengineering or Business Process Management (BPM). For example, several companies embarked on Six Sigma programs after their CEO heard about GE's success with the approach, and many other companies have adopted Lean because of Toyota's success.

The 5 Requirements of a Truly Innovative Company

Harvard Business Review

By comparison, think of the long strides many businesses have made in reengineering their supply chains, boosting product quality, and rolling out lean six sigma. In our experience, it can take several months for a company to hammer out its defini­tion of innovation.