Book Review of “The Culture Cycle: How to Shape the Unseen Force that Transforms Performance”

The Practical Leader

John Kotter and James Heskett’s classic book, Corporate Culture and Performance , is an organization development classic. Harvard Business School professor, James Heskett’s new book, The Culture Cycle: How to Shape the Unseen Force That Transforms Performance , follows up his and John Kotter’s earlier work with updated research, current examples, and pertinent observations. Results (Four Rs, innovation, growth, and profitability).

Culture Cycle: The Unseen Force that Transforms Performance

Harvard Business Review

Heskett describes how an effective culture can account for up to half of the differential in performance between organizations in the same business. Listen as Heskett explains how to shape and sustain your company's culture, so that it fosters innovation and influences successful strategies.

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How to Ignite and Sustain Organizational Growth

Skip Prichard

James Heskett and John Kotter found that organizations with strong corporate cultures realized over eleven years revenue growth of 682 percent, employment growth of 282 percent and stock price growth of 901 percent. Culture Spark. Organizational culture is often seen as an elusive topic.

What Great Companies Know About Culture

Harvard Business Review

Heskett wrote in his latest book The Culture Cycle , effective culture can account for 20-30 percent of the differential in corporate performance when compared with "culturally unremarkable" competitors. Competitiveness, customer loyalty, innovation, and productivity — while critical to daily operations — trailed behind with each under 20 percent. Even in this unprecedented business environment , great leaders know they should invest in their people.

Is Kindness a Strategy?

Harvard Business Review

I'm sure many supervisors at American would have issues with their colleague's innovative, if mildly deceptive, solution. Heskett of Harvard Business School observes, it's important to endow workers on the front line with "latitude within limits." A friend recently described a remarkable travel experience. Strange to say, the story was about an airline, and it wasn't a travel nightmare.