Unrealistic Expectations of Innovation & Entrepreneurs

Mills Scofield

Yet, when we discuss the birth and development of innovations and companies, it’ [.]. Venture Capital Strategy Startups Start-up Stage-gate Prototype Innovation Glengary Funding Experiment Entrepreneur Business PlanningHumans are one of the few mammals whose babies are not fully developed at birth. Unlike horses, whales, etc., human babies can’t stand, walk, or forage on their own at birth.

What do Blue Lobsters Have to do With Innovation? Everything!

Mills Scofield

Because the key to innovation isn’t processes, stage gates, weird exercises, or competitions. The key to innovation has been and always will be People. I view the commitment to innovate, in the companies I’ve worked for and with, as a spectrum of lobsters - from cooked, to live, to rare blue ones. Red Lobsters think they innovate and believe they want to, but not enough to expand their comfort zone and hire the right people to do it.

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What do Blue Lobsters Have to do With Innovation? Everything!

Mills Scofield

Because the key to innovation isn’t processes, stage gates, weird exercises, or competitions. The key to innovation has been and always will be People. Innovation may be a designated job residing in a small part of the organization instead of throughout the culture.

Putting Humans at the Center of Health Care Innovation

Harvard Business

The healthcare industry has long relied on traditional, linear models of innovation – basic and applied research followed by development and commercialization. While this “lab-bench to bedside” approach has improved healthcare globally, it can take years, even decades, for an innovation to get to market, often with limited input from patients themselves. This model isn’t just about getting greater patient feedback during the innovation process.

Two Questions to Ask Before You Set Up an Innovation Unit

Harvard Business

Despite good intentions—and widespread acceptance of the importance of innovation—efforts to innovate at large companies often lack a clear mission and framework, and as a result, they go off the rails. At one large European energy company we consulted with, no less than four separate corporate functions were supposed to be working on innovation—yet none of them was supporting critical needs at the business unit level. How centralized is the Innovation Unit?

How to Hand Off an Innovation Project from One Team to Another

Harvard Business

That fear drives their companies to invest millions into coming up with breakthrough innovations. Truth is, you can have the right portfolio of investments, the right metrics and governance, the right stage-gate development process, and the right talent on the right teams — but if you don’t design the right handoffs between your teams, all of that planning falls apart. These labels also nicely describe the phases of innovation: Explore, Scale, and Optimize.

Innovation's Nine Critical Success Factors

Harvard Business Review

a Boston-based innovation management collaborative. Your organization won't innovate productively unless some underlying factors are in good shape. A compelling case for innovation. Unless people understand why innovation is necessary, it always loses to core business or the performance engine in the battle for resources. So the case for innovation has to be made, and it better be compelling. A fully aligned strategic innovation agenda.

Big Data In Your Shampoo?

Mills Scofield

In the case of the former, they typically would want to know why and how could they innovate their current product to regain their position as number one. While it may have mitigated the clients'' losses some of the time, the innovation was inevitably reactive, unscientific, and not robust nor holistic. The secret is in connecting the analyses and insights derived from Big Data to real NPD and innovation decisions. Did you wash your hair this morning?

What Big Companies Get Wrong About Innovation Metrics

Harvard Business Review

The fear of getting Netflix-ed or Uber-ized is spurring big companies to dial up their investment in innovation. Companies as diverse as AIG, Disney, and Intuit have been building innovation teams, launching “accelerator” programs to attract promising startups, and giving employees seed funding to test out new ideas with real customers. One type is what we call “activity” metrics, which show that you’re busy stoking the boilers of innovation.

The 5 Requirements of a Truly Innovative Company

Harvard Business Review

Can you think of any business topic that’s been hotter for longer than innovation? By now, your company probably has a new busi­ness incubator, an idea wiki, a disciplined process for mining customer insights, an awards program for successful innovators, and maybe even an outpost in Silicon Valley—all fine ideas—and yet, most likely, it still struggles to meet its growth goals and seldom thrills its customers. So it is with innovation. Innovation

Can’t Find a Steve Jobs? Hire an Innovation Organizer Instead

Harvard Business Review

Improving innovation is one of the key competencies that companies often look for when replacing a CEO. Yet committees responsible for recommending candidates often grapple with finding the right person for the job when an innovation emperor like Steve Jobs isn’t available. A study of more than two dozen consumer packaged goods companies that I led while working as a senior executive at Nielsen reveals exactly what they should be looking for instead: an innovation organizer.

From idea to strategy

Lead on Purpose

Filed under: Leadership , Knowledge , Market-driven , Innovation , Product Management / Marketing Tagged: | strategy , customer focus , products , services , Carol Bartz , Yahoo! In Bartz’s case, there is a queue of TPSE to work through before they stage gate the emerging ideas against strategy alignment.

A Disciplined Approach to Evaluating Ideas

Harvard Business Review

That's one memorable piece of advice from a leader at a global innovation powerhouse. The general way around this problem seems simple enough — have a process by which you evaluate ideas in different ways at different stages of development (most call this a "stage-gate process."). Distinct differences separate how a corporation and a venture capital fund approach innovation. Disruptive innovation Innovation

Taming Your Company's Most Elusive Beast

Harvard Business Review

Innovation is one those evergreen themes: it is a rare CEO who doesn't list innovation as one her top four or five priorities. But innovation is an elusive beast. R&D investments have been made, stage/gate processes have been built, creativity training courses have been run, and yet the outputs — exciting new products and services — don't seem to be falling into place. Consider, for example, the UK software company, Red Gate. Innovation

Ready for Growth, But Not Prepared

Harvard Business Review

Likewise, most of the respondents said that scaling innovation was crucial, but nearly half rated themselves as either low or below average in this area. The companies did reasonably well on making decisions using a formal process and managing projects using a disciplined approach (such as the stage/gate methodology).

Obama Won With Minorities. Marketers Should Too

Harvard Business Review

Make it a management team exercise to have a new ethnic experience together, and then discuss how it could shape your innovation and portfolio. Be sure that your innovation process stage gate isn't a taste test amongst folks with merely a mainstream palate, but ones that reflect the appropriate variety in the market.