When Will this Low-Innovation Internet Era End?

Harvard Business Review

Then there's another view, which I heard from author Neal Stephenson in an MIT lecture hall last week. Stephenson was clearly trying to be provocative. But he's not alone in the judgment that we're not actually living in an era of great innovation. But the innovations Brynjolffson has been looking at are mostly organizational. Innovation Tech industry TechnologyIt's an age of unprecedented, staggering technological change.

Why Business Leaders Need to Read More Science Fiction

Harvard Business Review

Singapore has overtaken Silicon Valley as the world’s innovation hub after FDA regulation prompts a brain drain from California. Neal Stephenson’s The Diamond Age inspired Jeff Bezos to create the Kindle ; Sergey Brin mines Stephenson’s even more famous Snow Crash for insights into virtual reality. Leadership Innovation Creativity Digital ArticleAt the end of the 19th century, New York City stank.

Don't Like the Message? Maybe It's the Messenger

Harvard Business Review

I wrote a post here at hbr.org on whether the Internet era has been a time of world-changing innovation or a relative disappointment. It was inspired by comments from author Neal Stephenson, who espoused the latter view in a Q&A at MIT. So I wrote a piece juxtaposing the Stephenson/Cowen view with the work of MIT's Erik Brynjolfsson, who has been amassing evidence that a digitization-fueled economic revolution is in fact beginning to happen. Conflict Innovation Internet

The Stakeholders You Need to Close a Big Deal

Harvard Business Review

The champions I’ve known have been motivated by a host of related factors – generating personal visibility, drawing attention and resources to their domain, or being perceived as innovators. The decision maker at AT&T was CEO Randall Stephenson. Pete spent 9 months helping us build a solid platform of credibility that would limit Stephenson’s risk if the investment turned out to be bad. With that, Stephenson felt he could defend his decision.

Can Being Overconfident Make You a Better Leader?

Harvard Business Review

Randall Stephenson, then CEO of AT&T, famously said , “I told people you weren’t betting on a device. As such, our findings are consistent with research showing that overconfident CEOs are better innovators. OLI SCARFF/Getty Images. When Apple CEO Steve Jobs approached AT&T about partnering on a new kind of mobile phone — a touchscreen computer that would fit in your pocket — Apple had no expertise in the mobile market.

People Suffer at Work When They Can’t Discuss the Racial Bias They Face Outside of It

Harvard Business Review

To drive home the urgency, the coalition’s website, CEOAction.com , directs visitors to research showing that diverse teams and inclusive leaders unleash innovation, eradicate groupthink, and spur market growth. At the Center for Talent Innovation, we wanted to look into these suspicions.

The Rise, Fall, and Rebirth of the U.S. Antitrust Movement

Harvard Business Review

The authorities accepted the increased risks from concentrated telecommunications, financial, and radio industries, among others, for the prospect of future efficiencies and innovation. However, they argue that these firms achieve their “superstar” status with superior quality, lower costs, or greater innovation. All agree that intervention should be measured to avoid chilling competition, innovation and investment. Tim Evans for HBR.