The 10 Elements of Positive Performance Management

Great Leadership By Dan

Guest post from John Mattone: The fundamental belief underlying Positive Performance Management (PPM) is this: Leaders and their employees must strive to make performance reviews complete, honest, and timely. In the course of executing PPM, you should hold yourself to the highest standards of character, always being fair and honest and never injuring a person’s sense of dignity and self-worth. The Ten Elements of Positive Performance Management.

Managing Results by Defining “Deliverables” Early On

QAspire

Home Go to QAspire.com Guest Posts Disclaimer Managing Results by Defining “Deliverables” Early On As professionals, we all are responsible for shipping stuff to our customers (internal or external). As a manager, it helps if you can clearly define what deliverable means. Bonus: QAspire Blog was recently featured on Community of Program and Project Managers (PPM Community). with Phil Gerbyshak Management Craft Nicholas Bate NOOP.NL

PPM 116

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A Round Up of My Writing in August 2010

QAspire

QAspire Blog was recently featured on Community of Program and Project Managers (PPM Community). Thanks to Amit Agarwal (India’s first Professional Blogger at award winning Digital Inspiration blog) for listing QAspire Blog in Directory of Top Indian Blogs under ‘HR/Management/Business’ category. with Phil Gerbyshak Management Craft Nicholas Bate NOOP.NL

PPM 100

Research: Stale Office Air Is Making You Less Productive

Harvard Business

In the first phase of our study, we enrolled 24 “knowledge workers” — managers, architects, and designers — to spend six days, over a two-week period, in a highly controlled work environment at the Syracuse Center of Excellence. schools (1400 ppm). What should leaders and building managers take away from these findings? In most buildings, managers can take action immediately.

PPM 44

The First 90 Days in a New CIO Position

Harvard Business Review

Managing this rapid change and fostering innovation while "keeping the trains running on time" is the primary leadership role required of any CIO, new or old. The following are a few key areas on which I''ve focused in my first 90 days that I think would be valuable for other new CIOs to consider as they plan for their own organizations'' future: Create a Sound Service and Project Management Framework. IT management Information & technology

PPM 12