Leading Thoughts for May 27, 2021

Leading Blog

Managers who do not allow time for exploration or do not schedule in incubation periods are unwittingly standing in the way of the creative process.”. People carry tacit knowledge. … Tacit knowledge exists only in people’s heads.

Gary Klein: An interview by Bob Morris

First Friday Book Synopsis

He also developed methods of Cognitive Task Analysis for uncovering the tacit knowledge that goes into decision […]. Gary Klein, Ph.D., is a Senior Scientist at MacroCognition, LLC. He was instrumental in founding the field of Naturalistic Decision Making. ?He He developed a Recognition-Primed Decision (RPD) model to describe how people actually make decisions in natural settings.

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How Women of Color Get to Senior Management

Harvard Business

To increase diversity at senior executive levels, more must be known about one group in particular: women of color in midlevel leadership, who successfully developed and progressed beyond individual contributor and first-line management. How did (or didn’t) managers play a role? They were employed in midlevel to upper-midlevel management positions in strategy, finance, marketing, legal, operations, and technology functions. They pursue management challenges.

Help Employees Create Knowledge — Not Just Share It

Harvard Business

Many leaders see organizational learning simply as sharing existing knowledge. This view of learning was the key driver of “knowledge management systems” that came into vogue in the 1990’s. These systems sought to make existing knowledge more accessible to those who might need it in the form of knowledge repositories that collected and indexed documents as well as directories of expertise that could point employees to others who had relevant know-how.

Are You Wasting Money On Useless Knowledge Management?

Harvard Business Review

Is your company investing in expensive knowledge management systems that are useless for making big, strategy decisions? Most companies recognize the need for knowledge management, but often delegate it to the IT and HR departments without linking it to corporate strategy, often thereby wasting both resources and the strategic options their firm's knowledge could generate. In our simplified format, knowledge assets map along two dimensions.

Stop Obsessing Over Intellectual Property Rights

Harvard Business Review

While seeking intellectual property rights (IPR) is entirely appropriate for your well-structured knowledge, putting serious effort into mapping the deep, implicit knowledge within your organization can prove equally valuable. Exploiting this deep knowledge entails strategically mapping the know-how usually just carried in the heads of individual employees, or by groups of your employees working together, in tacit, interpersonal organizational routines.

How to Successfully Work Across Countries, Languages, and Cultures

Harvard Business

The CEO, Hiroshi Mikitani, realized that doing business in multiple languages prevented the organization from sharing valuable knowledge across the organization’s existing global operations, as well as those that were being newly established. This type of orientation can be incredibly valuable to cultivate for anyone working for multinationals or in other global careers, and can also be used by managers to develop employees. Photo by Christine Roy.

How Fear Helps (and Hurts) Entrepreneurs

Harvard Business

Intuition is a potent source of information, and research has demonstrated that among experts, tacit knowledge and gut instinct lead to rapid and effective decision-making. This might be for core knowledge, such as computer coding skills on the part of the software entrepreneur seeking financing, or learning to cope with the high pace of activities that most entrepreneurs experience. MirageC/Getty Images.

The Boomers are Leaving! – How to Create and Implement a Knowledge.

Strategy Driven

– How to Create and Implement a Knowledge Transfer Program, part 2 Posted by Ken Ball and Gina Gotsill on November 17, 2010 · 2 Comments Now that you’ve looked at your workforce (in The Boomers are Leaving! – How to Create and Implement a Knowledge Transfer Program, part 1 ), you’re ready to design and develop a program that retains Baby Boomers’ knowledge. Manager can avoid this by taking some steps now to prepare for the day when key workers leave.

How Corporate HQ Can Get More from Innovation Outposts

Harvard Business

So, even if the outposts manage to absorb local value they usually fail to propagate it back to the organization, which means they fail on the ultimate reason for their existence. Most of the absorbed knowledge — local contacts and relationships, intelligence, insights, and so on — left with them. In March 1848 San Francisco newspaperman Samuel Brannan announced that gold had been found in California.

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The MBA M-Prize's Winning Hack

Harvard Business Review

Last Monday, the Management Innovation Exchange announced the winners of the first MBA M-Prize, which I wrote about some months ago. From 114 entries (or hacks) that offered proposals for correcting flaws in current management practice, the judges initially narrowed down the field to seven finalists. Both Roth and Tandon had worked as management consultants before seeking their MBAs, and they understand that tacit knowledge is critical for professional service companies.

Executive Education Is Ripe for Online Disruption

Harvard Business Review

Second, to fully appreciate the forces at work in executive education, we need to complement this view with another body of theory from knowledge management. Education is basically that — knowledge sharing. and I wrote a much-cited HBR article a decade ago where we argued that different kinds of knowledge require different kinds of sharing approaches. We called it a codification strategy to knowledge sharing.

Algorithms Make Better Predictions — Except When They Don’t

Harvard Business

Further, algorithms cannot (yet, anyway) tap intuition — the soft factors that are not data inputs, the tacit knowledge that experienced managers deploy every day, nor the creative genius of innovators. So what should managers, especially leaders, do? ” Perhaps the prediction and explanation of a new product manager, aiming to score points with the boss, who is demanding across-the-board improvements.

We Learn More When We Learn Together

Harvard Business Review

However, we don’t need to learn with others in formal training or development programs: we can architect our own opportunities to gain insight, knowledge, and skills that move us on an upward trajectory. We grow in high-quality connections because our thinking is broadened, we absorb knowledge more quickly, our action repertoire is expanded, and we are more engaged, playful, open, and resilient in the face of setbacks. Managing yourself Articledave wheeler FOR HBR.

With New York Schools Appointment, Bloomberg Did it His Way

Harvard Business Review

Black has no management experience in education — her entire career has been spent in magazine publishing — and her contact with the public school system in New York has been very limited. The contretemps over this appointment brings to mind three classic management issues, and research about them that is too often ignored. By definition, tacit knowledge comes with time — so outsiders must approach organizations with humility.

The Limits of 3D Printing

Harvard Business Review

Both steps require tacit knowledge. Operations Manufacturing Supply chain Operations management ManufacturingContrary to what some say , 3D printing is not going to revolutionize the manufacturing sector, rendering traditional factories obsolete. The simple fact of the matter is the economics of 3D printing now and for the foreseeable future make it an unfeasible way to produce the vast majority of parts manufactured today.

Structure Your Global Team for Innovation

Harvard Business Review

That's partly because they manage global projects like traditional ones. But single-location projects draw on a reservoir or shared tacit knowledge and trust that global projects lack. To get the most from dispersed innovation, managers need a different playbook. Here are three ways to set up and manage global innovation for success: 1. Assign oversight and support responsibility to a senior manager.

Structure Your Global Team for Innovation

Harvard Business Review

That's partly because they manage global projects like traditional ones. But single-location projects draw on a reservoir or shared tacit knowledge and trust that global projects lack. To get the most from dispersed innovation, managers need a different playbook. Here are three ways to set up and manage global innovation for success: 1. Assign oversight and support responsibility to a senior manager.

How to Bring in a New CEO for Your Startup

Harvard Business Review

The following steps can be used to successfully manage the transition to new leadership: Determine the strategy for the startup and identify CEO candidates’ experience executing a similar strategy. The right replacement CEO will complement the existing leadership team’s skill sets and have experience in scaling and managing a company through the startup’s upcoming stages of growth. As the company grows, its management skills need to evolve.

Engage Your Long-Time Employees to Improve Performance

Harvard Business Review

In today’s knowledge-based economy, companies and products are intricately specialized and experience counts for a lot. Tenure matters not only because years of work in a given profession yield deep specialist knowledge. Through countless hours of collaboration with the same coworkers and teams, veteran employees gain tacit knowledge that allows them to predict how colleagues will behave and anticipate how they will respond to everyday situations.

Why Staff Turnover in the White House Is Such a Bad Thing — Especially For President Trump

Harvard Business

Additionally, high levels of turnover in an organization’s top management team are very likely to make the organization as a whole perform substantially worse. The members of high performance teams have a high level of tacit knowledge about one another — in other words, they understand each other on a personal level that stretches far beyond knowledge of each other’s resumes. Government Talent management Employee retention Digital Article

Facebook Changes Upend Advertiser and Agency Models

Harvard Business Review

Even when optimizing to a transaction, they do so with tacit knowledge of what each transaction is worth. Technology platforms here and there sprout up to help them do it better, but even those platforms become commodities if engagement-driven efforts are not handled and managed expertly, in an always-on way. Be comfortable with the fact that they are generally not actually "managing communities" on Facebook, but rather, programming content and engagement channels.

The Trouble with Mary Chen

Harvard Business Review

Chinese managers and owners in Chinese-owned businesses play by the same rules. But when a Chinese manager joins a foreign-owned firm, she will have to learn to play by new rules, because her career and salary now depend on foreign supervisors based in faraway places such as New York or London and who come to China no more than twice a year. Take the case of Mary Chen, the general manager for the China region of a multinational company from Europe.

Case Study: Will Our Chinese Partner Copy Our Technology?

Harvard Business Review

Prime ElektroTek's chairman had just announced big news to the employees and managers gathered on the shop floor: The Taipei-based company, which over the past decade had evolved from building simple power supplies to designing hybrid electric power trains for automobiles, had finally secured a deal with Blue Sky Vehicles, a state-owned enterprise that was one of the most dynamic automakers in China. Lin Dachun, the VP and general manager of the automobile electronics unit, cheered.

Algorithms Make Better Predictions — Except When They Don’t

Harvard Business Review

Further, algorithms cannot (yet, anyway) tap intuition — the soft factors that are not data inputs, the tacit knowledge that experienced managers deploy every day, nor the creative genius of innovators. So what should managers, especially leaders, do? Perhaps the prediction and explanation of a new product manager, aiming to score points with the boss, who is demanding across-the-board improvements. This is the key insight smart managers really seek.

Getting Smarter about Google's "Brain Drain"

Harvard Business Review

Just yesterday, on the front page of the New York Times , came a report about how "low-level engineers, product managers and prominent managers" from the executive ranks are leaving the company for high-profile companies such as Facebook as well as venture-funded startups of the sort that dot the technology landscape. Lesson 2: If you want to keep great contributors, develop better managers. They don't want to manage people who are smarter than they are.