Why Business Leaders Need to Read More Science Fiction

Harvard Business

Rising sea levels flood Manhattan in Kim Stanley Robinson’s New York 2140 , prompting hedge fund managers and real estate investors to create a new intertidal market index. Neal Stephenson’s The Diamond Age inspired Jeff Bezos to create the Kindle ; Sergey Brin mines Stephenson’s even more famous Snow Crash for insights into virtual reality. At the end of the 19th century, New York City stank.

Can Being Overconfident Make You a Better Leader?

Harvard Business

When Apple CEO Steve Jobs approached AT&T about partnering on a new kind of mobile phone — a touchscreen computer that would fit in your pocket — Apple had no expertise in the mobile market. Randall Stephenson, then CEO of AT&T, famously said , “I told people you weren’t betting on a device. OLI SCARFF/Getty Images.

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People Suffer at Work When They Can’t Discuss the Racial Bias They Face Outside of It

Harvard Business

To drive home the urgency, the coalition’s website, CEOAction.com , directs visitors to research showing that diverse teams and inclusive leaders unleash innovation, eradicate groupthink, and spur market growth. And in an emotional recounting of his black friend’s experience outside the office that went viral on YouTube, AT&T chairman Randall Stephenson encouraged employees to get to know each other better.

The Stakeholders You Need to Close a Big Deal

Harvard Business Review

The ask: invest $35 million for exclusive bundling rights to the US market. Cool new technology, new market for AT&T, competitive pressure, etc. The decision maker at AT&T was CEO Randall Stephenson. His goal was to effectively capture the potential upside of an emerging market and shut out AT&T’s competitors without sacrificing his own credibility. With that, Stephenson felt he could defend his decision.

Welcome to HBR's Customer Intelligence Insight Center

Harvard Business Review

As early as 1994 Neal Stephenson was envisioning the era of Big Data, and how it might change the work of a market researcher. Then there's the problem of the sheer volume of data being generated; Pat Spenner and Anna Bird of the Corporate Executive Board share research showing how little use of it is really made by the typical marketing department. Customers Information & technology Marketing

When Will this Low-Innovation Internet Era End?

Harvard Business Review

Then there's another view, which I heard from author Neal Stephenson in an MIT lecture hall last week. Stephenson was clearly trying to be provocative. but the emerging markets boom has generally been more about catching up than exploiting cutting-edge technology.). Stephenson, who has "devoted a shocking amount of time" lately to learning about alternative space-launch technologies, said at MIT that "the reason none of them happen turns out to be insurance.".

To Stay Relevant, Your Company and Employees Must Keep Learning

Harvard Business Review

As AT&T CEO and Chair Randall Stephenson, recently told the New York Times, “There is a need to retool yourself, and you should not expect to stop… People who do not spend five to 10 hours a week in online learning will obsolete themselves with the technology.” My hypothesis, and Stephenson agrees, is that for organizations to win in the market, they must help their employees stay relevant in their skills. To atrophy is to lose in the market.

Why Mergers Like the At&T-Time Warner Deal Should Go Through

Harvard Business

But CEO Randall Stephenson immediately denied both versions, and reiterated that the company will not let go of either CNN or the deal itself, pledging to fight the government if necessary. Of those, three were abandoned by the parties, while the other 20, including AOL’s merger with Time Warner in 2000, were approved, many with conditions designed to deter theoretical harms to their markets. A rational content owner would look for new markets, not foreclose them.

The 3 Things CEOs Worry About the Most

Harvard Business Review

Randall Stephenson of AT&T explained, “We had 270,000 people we employed around the globe. ” Staton identified the challenge of managing a global brand: “We had the McDonald’s brand, and in each country our market share and the product life cycle were in different stages. So the challenge was to have the broad marketing strategies with local adaptations.” CEOs have a lot to worry about, but what are their greatest concerns?

The Rise, Fall, and Rebirth of the U.S. Antitrust Movement

Harvard Business

Adopting the Chicago School’s assumptions of self-correcting markets, composed of rational, self-interested market participants, some courts and enforcers sacrificed important political, social, and moral values to promote certain economic beliefs. Market forces could naturally correct the episodic instances of market power, and could do so far better than the messes caused by government intervention. Tim Evans for HBR. What happened to the antitrust movement ?

How to Conduct an Effective Job Interview

Harvard Business Review

As the employment market improves and candidates have more options , hiring the right person for the job has become increasingly difficult. Chris Smith and Chris Stephenson. The virtual stack of resumes in your inbox is winnowed and certain candidates have passed the phone screen. Next step: in-person interviews. How should you use the relatively brief time to get to know — and assess — a near stranger? How many people at your firm should be involved?