Making Microfinance More Effective

Harvard Business Review

The Grameen model of microfinance gained a great deal of attention in the international development field after early data showed that it was associated with high repayment and low default. However, despite the potential of insurance products to provide a “risk floor” for farmers and encourage higher-productivity investments and behavior, uptake at market prices is extremely low and commercial offerings have not found a profitable delivery model. For the 2.5

Guest Post: An Entrepreneur's Thoughts on Market Incentives & Foreign Aid

Mills Scofield

One of his main tasks was to structure a hedging derivative that negated foreign exchange risks so that Microfinance institutions could take safer loans from the developed world. This is a guest blog by Chia Han Sheng, Brown University '14, co-founder of MedInternational.

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Can Technology End Poverty?

Harvard Business Review

Shameran Abed, who runs BRAC's microfinance program, explains what happened: "In the first couple months, a lot of our borrowers would send the money through their mobile phones and then physically show up at the branch to check with the accountant that the money had turned up.".

Can Technology End Poverty?

Harvard Business Review

Shameran Abed, who runs BRAC's microfinance program, explains what happened: "In the first couple months, a lot of our borrowers would send the money through their mobile phones and then physically show up at the branch to check with the accountant that the money had turned up.".

What Makes Social Entrepreneurs Different

Harvard Business Review

Social entrepreneurs have also been some of the most attentive followers of the academic debate between the likes of Mark Pitt and Jonathan Murdoch about whether microfinance really helps reduce poverty. That the person paying the price sufficiently benefits is actually secondary.