The productivity imperative

First Friday Book Synopsis

Here is an excerpt from an article co-authored by Peter Bisson, Elizabeth Stephenson, and S. Bob's blog entries Amazon Elizabeth Stephenson France Telecom’s Orange GDP growth Germany’s T-Systems Kindle OECD countries Peter Bisson Rik Kirkland S. Patrick Viguerie for The McKinsey Quarterly.

Why Business Leaders Need to Read More Science Fiction

Harvard Business Review

Neal Stephenson’s The Diamond Age inspired Jeff Bezos to create the Kindle ; Sergey Brin mines Stephenson’s even more famous Snow Crash for insights into virtual reality. They make us more efficient and productive. At the end of the 19th century, New York City stank. One hundred fifty thousand horses ferried people and goods through the streets of Manhattan, producing 45,000 tons — tons! — of manure a month.

To Stay Relevant, Your Company and Employees Must Keep Learning

Harvard Business Review

As AT&T CEO and Chair Randall Stephenson, recently told the New York Times, “There is a need to retool yourself, and you should not expect to stop… People who do not spend five to 10 hours a week in online learning will obsolete themselves with the technology.”

When Will this Low-Innovation Internet Era End?

Harvard Business Review

Then there's another view, which I heard from author Neal Stephenson in an MIT lecture hall last week. Stephenson was clearly trying to be provocative. Gordon's productivity research.) It was only as new factories were built that took advantage of the unique properties of electric motors that a productivity boom ensued. It's an age of unprecedented, staggering technological change.

The Stakeholders You Need to Close a Big Deal

Harvard Business Review

OnLive’s product enabled high-end video games to be hosted in the cloud and played from any device. Regardless of where they started their careers, most decision makers spend the majority of their days dealing with macro issues and are unlikely to have the expertise required to have a detailed understanding of your company or product. The decision maker at AT&T was CEO Randall Stephenson. With that, Stephenson felt he could defend his decision.

Can Being Overconfident Make You a Better Leader?

Harvard Business Review

Randall Stephenson, then CEO of AT&T, famously said , “I told people you weren’t betting on a device. There was also no way that Apple could have met its tight product timelines, or kept its products shrouded in secrecy until launch, without fierce commitments from its employees. OLI SCARFF/Getty Images.

Winning the Elusive Marquee-Brand Customer Advocate

Harvard Business Review

As Michael Stephenson , a key leader in global customer programs at Oracle puts it, his firm has various business units that focus on specific industries. After she''s achieved some success with your product or service, instead of asking for a reference or testimonial, suggest collaborating on a case study or ROI report that''s about her success (using your product or service) rather than all about how great your firm is.

How to Conduct an Effective Job Interview

Harvard Business Review

Your goal is to “make them comfortable” so that you have a productive, professional conversation. Chris Smith and Chris Stephenson. The virtual stack of resumes in your inbox is winnowed and certain candidates have passed the phone screen. Next step: in-person interviews.

The Rise, Fall, and Rebirth of the U.S. Antitrust Movement

Harvard Business Review

“Firms in industries with the largest increases in product market concentration have enjoyed higher profit margins, positive abnormal stock returns, and more profitable M&A deals, which suggests that market power is becoming an important source of value.” After all, Randall Stephenson was one of President Trump’s “biggest defenders on public policy” and viewed the antitrust case as “a big curve ball.” Tim Evans for HBR.