When Clinicians Know They’re Being Watched, Patients Fare Better

Harvard Business

In the 1920s, a series of experiments were conducted at Hawthorne Works, a Western Electric telephone factory just outside Chicago, to study the effects of lighting on worker productivity. The “Hawthorne effect,” as it is now known, has been well-documented in social science : individuals, typically research subjects, actively change their behavior when they know they are being observed and monitored. The effect goes beyond productivity.

Uber Shows How Not to Apply Behavioral Economics

Harvard Business

Over the last few years, organizations in both the private and public sectors have applied some of the insights from behavioral economics to address a wide range of problems — from reducing cheating on taxes, work stress, and turnover to encouraging healthy habits, increasing savings for retirement as well as turning up to vote (as I wrote previously ). Checklists describe several standard critical processes of care that many operating rooms typically implement from memory.