Remove BPM Remove Development Remove Management Remove Technology
article thumbnail

Macro Maps Help You Align Processes and Strategy

Strategy Driven

Many thanks to my colleague Jerry Talley for initially developing this concept of a Macro Map. I suggest starting with a small group of executives/managers who know the work of the department or division. (If With the managers: Begin with listing the customers – the people who receive or use the output. A Macro Map can help.

Process 69
article thumbnail

HR should be at the heart of process improvement

Chartered Management Institute

I wrote recently about the importance of placing people at the heart of your process improvement efforts and avoiding the trap of focusing on technology. The key to achieving this is having organisational development as a core part of what your HR department does, with process improvement then a key part of that continuous improvement.

Process 69
Insiders

Sign Up for our Newsletter

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

article thumbnail

Avoid the Improvement Hype Cycle

Harvard Business Review

The result: Employees get confused and cynical (senior management's "flavor of the month"). Fed by consultants, gurus, technology vendors, and academics, their enthusiasm for a particular process improvement method takes on a religious tone (as I described in my last post.) Under the guidance of external coaches, the $7.2

article thumbnail

How Cloud Computing Is Changing Management

Harvard Business Review

Theories and practices of management often spring from the opportunities created by new technologies. Client-server technology begat enterprise resource planning systems, and the consequent system-wide visibility that was required for what we call business process management (BPM). yagi studio/Getty Images.

article thumbnail

Uniting the Religions of Process Improvement

Harvard Business Review

When they set out to turn around processes that have become woefully inefficient or ineffective, most companies choose one of four process improvement "religions": Lean , Six Sigma , Business Reengineering or Business Process Management (BPM). In some of these companies, senior managers were dubious about the claims.