Blind Spots & Johari Window

CO2

Joseph Luft and Harrington Ingham created the Johari Window nearly 30 years ago to describe hum an behavior. by Calvin Guyer Blind Spots.

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Self-Awareness: How do your peers see you differently than you see yourself?

CO2

One way to locate these blind spots is to use the Johari Window , created by Joseph Luft and Harrington Ingham. by Gary Cohen Self-Awareness: How do your peers see you differently than you see yourself? All leaders have blind spots –even the most self-aware among us.

The Rainmaker 'Fab Five' Blog Picks of the Week - A Look Ahead at 2011

Maximizing Possibility

Jon Ingham's Strategic HCM Blog : Is 2011 the Time to Stop Treating People Like Tools? Jon Ingham's Strategic HCM Blog : Is 2011 the Time to Stop Treating People Like Tools?

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The Best Version Of You

Tim Milburn

In 1955, Joseph Luft and Harry Ingham developed an interpersonal relationship and communication tool known as the Johari Window. There are a number of versions of you (and me) out there.

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The Best Version Of You

Tim Milburn

In 1955, Joseph Luft and Harry Ingham developed an interpersonal relationship and communication tool known as the Johari Window. Tweet There are a number of versions of you (and me) out there.

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Best of the Web Leadership Articles

Michael Lee Stallard

Jon Ingham presents Leading in the Love Shack at Management 2.0 Author/speaker Jason Seiden just posted a “best of the web&# collection of articles on leadership that includes the post I recently wrote about the CEO of Starbucks. Here’s what Jason wrote: For the uninitiated, the Leadership Development Carnival is collection of blog posts, normally maintained by Dan McCarthy of Great Leadership by Dan , about leadership development. A few notes: I read every submission.

Why Less is More in Teams

Harvard Business Review

In a brilliant twist on Ringelmann, Alan Ingham and three colleagues in the 1970s decided to recreate the experiment in the basement of the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Why is it that American football uses eleven players, Canadian football twelve, and Gaelic fifteen?