What We Can Learn About Unity from Hostile Takeovers

Harvard Business

Leadership Leadership transitions Government Mergers & acquisitions Digital ArticlePower transfers can be fraught. But there is a path forward.

Management Styles

Strategy Driven

As a reaction to industrial reforms and the strength of unions, a Hard Nosed style of leadership was prominent from 1910-1939, management’s attempt to take stronger hands, recapture some of the Captain of Industry style and build solidity into an economy plagued by the Depression. Management by Objectives came into vogue in 1965 and was the prevailing leadership style until 1990.

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The Big Picture of Business – Corporate Cultures Reflect Business Progress and Growth.

Strategy Driven

As a reaction to industrial reforms and the strength of unions, a Hard Nosed style of leadership was prominent from 1910-1939, management’s attempt to take stronger hands, recapture some of the Captain of Industry style and build solidity into an economy plagued by the Depression. Management by Objectives came into vogue in 1965 and was the prevailing leadership style until 1990.

12 Reasons Crisis Leadership Trumps Crisis Management

N2Growth Blog

One thing is for sure – we’ll all be better off when leaders stop trying to manage a crisis and become more proficient at crisis leadership. The key to not being caught flat-footed in a crisis is often found in a leader’s ability to understand the difference between Crisis Management and Crisis Leadership with respect to their effects on purpose and the future. Crisis Leadership, on the other hand, is ONLY about leading out from crises before it has a chance to begin.

Crisis 314

How Business Schools Can Help Reduce Inequality

Harvard Business Review

But starting in the late 1970s, a new vision of the corporation and the role of CEOs emerged – prodded by corporate “raiders,” hostile takeovers, junk bonds, and leveraged buyouts. Economy Education Leadership

Beware of Short-term Management, Not the Short-term Investor

Harvard Business Review

A low stock price can make the firm vulnerable to a hostile takeover, for example. Compensation Economy LeadershipThis blog post is part of the HBR Online Forum The CEO's Role in Fixing the System. Much has been made in recent years about the pernicious influence of short-term investors on corporate performance. I believe these arguments often miss a nuance: It is not the short-term investor but short-term management that is the problem.

What's Lost When Shareholders Rule

Harvard Business Review

which is by global standards pretty close to the textbook, would-be reformers often cite the British example (on shareholder input into executive pay, for example, or the ease of hostile takeovers) as something to strive toward. What exactly is wrong with the progressively greater control that banks, private equity investors, stock markets, and takeovers have exerted over the British corporate sector? Boards Leadership Mergers & Acquisitions