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12 Reasons Crisis Leadership Trumps Crisis Management

N2Growth Blog

1) Sudden Crisis: Natural disasters, terrorist attacks, workplace violence, hostile takeovers, environmental spills, technology disruptions, etc. By Damian D. “Skipper” Pitts. Chair, Organizational Development, N2Growth. The media lives for a crisis, politicians look for ways to gain advantage in a crisis, and some businesses will even try and profit from a crisis.

Management Styles

Strategy Driven

That’s my concern that financial-only focus without regard to other corporate dynamics bespeaks of hostile takeovers, ill-advised rollups and corporate raider activity in search of acquiring existing books of business.

The Big Picture of Business – Corporate Cultures Reflect Business Progress and Growth.

Strategy Driven

That’s my concern that financial-only focus without regard to other corporate dynamics bespeaks of hostile takeovers, ill-advised rollups and corporate raider activity in search of acquiring existing books of business. Organizations should coordinate management skills into its overall corporate strategy, in order to satisfy customer needs profitably, draw together the components for practical strategies and implement strategic requirements to impact the business.

A Short History of Golden Parachutes

Harvard Business Review

As I examined with my two co-authors, Mark Kennedy and Gerald Davis, in a 2012 research paper in the journal Organization Science, golden parachutes for top executives were created with very specific goals: to ensure shareholders wouldn’t lose out on beneficial M&A deals and to protect executives from the uncertainty of being fired in the wake of the corporate takeover wave of the 1980s. This was quickly followed by the era of hostile takeovers in the 1980s.

How Business Schools Can Help Reduce Inequality

Harvard Business Review

But starting in the late 1970s, a new vision of the corporation and the role of CEOs emerged – prodded by corporate “raiders,” hostile takeovers, junk bonds, and leveraged buyouts. No institution is more responsible for educating the CEOs of American corporations than Harvard Business School – inculcating in them a set of ideas and principles that have resulted in a pay gap between CEOs and ordinary workers that’s gone from 20-to-1 fifty years ago to almost 300-to-1 today.