EBM: Scientific Management

LDRLB

This post is part of a series called “Evidence-Based Management.” Scientific management (or Taylorism) is the first major theory of management. The core ideas of the theory were developed by Frederick Winslow Taylor in the 1880s and 1890s, and were first published in his monographs, Shop Management and The Principles of Scientific Management. However, Taylor’s effect on management thinking is undeniable.

The Legacy of F W Taylor - nobody wants to be called a manager?

Chartered Management Institute

The conference uses the occasion of the 100th anniversary of the publication of Frederick Winslow Taylor’s book Scientific Management , which is often credited with being the real beginning of the discipline of management as a discipline and an academic field. So if spending time in the Italian sunshine discussing the finer points of management theory with some top-notch academics appeals to you , a trip to Prato looks a good bet. F W Taylor nhs scientific management

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Peter Drucker’s Recommendations for Summer Reading: Five Management Classics

First Friday Book Synopsis

Bob's blog entries Bloomberg Businessweek Drucker Institute at Claremont Graduate University Elton Mayo Federalist Papers firm and lasting foundations for principles of management Frederick Winslow Taylor Henri Fayol Industrial and General Administration Peter Drucker Peter Drucker’s Recommendations for Summer Reading: Five Management Classics Rick Wartzman The Human Problems of an Industrial Civilization The Principles of Scientific Management

Fueling Business Process Management with the Automation Engine that Can!

Strategy Driven

Organizations deploy automation technologies as the primary resource in their Business Process Management. Fortunately, today’s business leaders have numerous technologies and solutions available in order to effectively manage and integrate their entire enterprise.

Management Styles

Strategy Driven

Organizations should coordinate management skills into its overall corporate strategy, in order to satisfy customer needs profitably, draw together the components for practical strategies and implement strategic requirements to impact the business. Under it, people were managed.

Stop Trying to Control People or Make Them Happy

Harvard Business Review

Whether you’ve heard of them or not, two gurus from the early 20 th century still dominate management thinking and practice — to our detriment. It has been more than 100 years since Frederick Taylor, an American engineer working in the steel business, published his seminal work on the principles of scientific management. Hence, the introduction of, say, a risk management team or a compliance unit or an innovation czar. Collaboration Managing people Productivity

If You Want to Motivate Employees, Stop Trusting Your Instincts

Harvard Business Review

Few topics have received more attention in talent management than motivation, defined as the deliberate attempt to influence employees’ behaviors with the goal of enhancing their performance, and in turn their organizational effectiveness. However, while the science of motivation is robust and well-established , it is rarely applied to real-world management practices, which tend to be based on managers’ intuition and subjective experience.

Managing in an Age of Winner-Take-All

Harvard Business Review

Over the last 250 years, waves upon waves of scientific and engineering advances have brought about an accelerating rise in living standards that even the two deadliest wars in history could not reverse. In other words, it depends on visionary management.

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Can Lean Manufacturing Put an End to Sweatshops?

Harvard Business Review

Traditional mass manufacturing is based on principles of “Scientific Management” that date back to the 19th century. Managers hold virtually all decision-making authority.

Don’t Set Process Without Input from Frontline Workers

Harvard Business Review

Taylor , the founder of scientific management who died 100 years ago. Michael Power of the London School of Economics describes the resulting explosion of bureaucracy as “the risk management of everything.” Operations Operations management Business processes Article

The Renaissance We Need in Business Education

Harvard Business Review

The Gordon-Howell Report in 1959, funded by the Ford Foundation, criticized the weak scientific foundation of business education, suggesting that professors were more like quacks than serious scholars. Perceiving a need for a more cerebral breed of managers to preside over corporations of unprecedented scale and scope, both looked for models to the research-driven natural science fields.

The Renaissance We Need in Business Education

Harvard Business Review

The Gordon-Howell Report in 1959, funded by the Ford Foundation, criticized the weak scientific foundation of business education, suggesting that professors were more like quacks than serious scholars. Perceiving a need for a more cerebral breed of managers to preside over corporations of unprecedented scale and scope, both looked for models to the research-rich natural science fields.

Why Corporate Social Responsibility Doesn’t Work

Harvard Business Review

The same kinds of dynamics probably play out among lower-level managers too, Roussanov says in this Wharton video. Nikil Saval writes on Pacific Standard that life hacking''s popularity says something about How We Live Today – it wouldn’t be popular if it didn’t "tap into something deeply corroded about the way work has, without much resistance, managed to invade every corner of our lives."

How Collaboration Tools Can Improve Knowledge Work

Harvard Business Review

As we automate more and more routine work, generating ever greater volumes of digital data, managers are focusing ever more on supporting knowledge workers — which these days is just about everybody. Frederick Winslow Taylor , regarded as the father of scientific management and one of the first management consultants in the early 1900s, believed workers were incapable of dissecting and improving their jobs.

EBM: The Hawthorne Studies

LDRLB

Elton Mayo, a scientific management researcher, wanted to examine the impact of work conditions on employee productivity. Mayo’s findings challenged many assumptions of scientific management. These new ideas would lay the foundation for a whole new way of thinking about management. Leadership evidence-based management hawthorne mayo The Hawthorne Studies were conducted from 1927 to 1932 at the Hawthorne Works plant outside of Chicago.

Why Management Ideas Matter

Harvard Business Review

Who is the most influential living management thinker? That is the question that the Thinkers50, the biennial global ranking of management thinkers , seeks to answer. But, celebrating the very best new thinking in management matters for three reasons. Second, management matters. It has become fashionable in some places to mock management. Managers are the fall guys, the scapegoats for organizational excesses, failures and inefficiencies.

Forget Brand Preference – Win the Brand Relevance War

Strategy Driven

Defining and Managing the Category or Subcategory. Understanding and managing relevance can be the difference between winning by becoming isolated from competitors or being mired in a difficult market environment where differentiation is hard to achieve and often short-lived.”

How IT Professionals Can Embrace the Serendipity Economy

Harvard Business Review

With Frederick''s Taylor invention of scientific management in the 1880s, and its subsequent assimilation into what we now consider modern management, organizations have used logic and rationality to the eliminate waste, to seek efficiency, and to transfer human knowledge to tools and processes.

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HBR Lives Where Taylorism Died

Harvard Business Review

Harvard Business Review editors go to work every day on articles they hope will make their mark on the history of management thinking. Coincidentally, the site where they go to work is itself of historical importance to management — because of a fight that is still alive today.

Don't Grieve for the Great A&P

Harvard Business Review

The first revolution came around the turn of the twentieth century, when the brothers took management roles in the tea-store chain run by their father, George H. This was the era of scientific management, when experts like Frederick Winslow Taylor kept busy measuring factory workers' every motion with the aim of improving productivity. John Hartford applied such scientific thinking to the grocery trade.

Five Good Reasons to Champion Auto-Analytics in Your Organization

Harvard Business Review

Below are five pointers to frame and guide the conversation for technology geeks and practitioners to champion the use of auto-analytics in their businesses: Auto-analytics can be understood within the tradition of scientific management. Management science has its roots in experimentation and productivity improvement. However, using personal data (emails, calendars, etc) and spreadsheets, some practitioners are developing personal yield management tools.