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Six Paradoxes Women Leaders Face in 2013

Harvard Business Review

Easing into the New Year, one big hope we have for 2013 is that women continue to bridge the gender gap in terms of pay equality and access to leadership positions. What this means for 2013 is that women have a huge opportunity to convert their connections into career advancement.

If You Want Innovation, You Have to Invest in People

Harvard Business Review

I’ve often thought that this was why, in the first three years of pitching NineSigma to a wide range of companies (from 2000 to 2003), only one management team, Procter & Gamble’s, quickly grasped its value proposition and integrated it into its innovation strategy (which it called Connect & Develop). Education Innovation Leadership development

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Redefining the Patient Experience with Collaborative Care

Harvard Business Review

It began its lean journey in 2003 and has made considerable progress. By 2013, all eight medical-surgical units in the two hospitals had been converted to the collaborative-care model.

IT Doesn't Matter (to CEOs)

Harvard Business Review

Even after more than 20 years of implementations, a study by Panorama shows that 53% of ERP projects still run over budget, 61% take longer to complete than anticipated, and more than 27% fail to produce the positive ROI expected. The senior leadership needs to become literate in technology.

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Why IBM Gives Top Employees a Month to Do Service Abroad

Harvard Business Review

So far, IBMers have completed over 1,000 projects. The IBM Corporate Service Corps is an example of how IBM is incorporating service into leadership development as a result of the success of another IBM program, IBM’s On Demand Community , which was launched in 2003 as an online marketplace to connect nonprofits with employees and retirees, as well as a portal offering resources to nonprofits of all kinds.

Why IBM Gives Top Employees a Month to Do Service Abroad

Harvard Business Review

So far, IBMers have completed over 1,000 projects. The IBM Corporate Service Corps is an example of how IBM is incorporating service into leadership development as a result of the success of another IBM program, IBM’s On Demand Community , which was launched in 2003 as an online marketplace to connect nonprofits with employees and retirees, as well as a portal offering resources to nonprofits of all kinds.