Depreciating Intellectual Capital

LDRLB

Hamel argued that on biggest challenges facing large companies was senior leadership “inability to write off their own depreciating intellectual capital. The value of their intellectual capital had decreased, and they didn’t adjust their books. LeaderLab Burkus competition hamel innovation intellectual capital knowledge pinkYesterday, I finally got around to listening to the latest Office Hours podcast from Daniel Pink.

Depreciating Intellectual Capital

LDRLB

Hamel argued that on biggest challenges facing large companies was senior leadership “inability to write off their own depreciating intellectual capital. The value of their intellectual capital had decreased, and they didn’t adjust their books. Leadership burkus competition hamel innovation intellectual capital knowledge pink Yesterday, I finally got around to listening to the latest Office Hours podcast from Daniel Pink.

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The Global Innovation 1000 (2011): Why Culture is Key

First Friday Book Synopsis

Bob's blog entries 3M Apple Booz & Company Buddy Media EBITDA Fscebook Google Harvard Business Review Intellectual Capital: The New Wealth of Organizations The Global Innovation 1000 (2011): Why Culture is Key Tom Stewart Wealth of Knowledge: Intellectual Capital and the Twenty-first Century OrganizationTom Stewart is Booz & Company’s Chief Marketing & Knowledge Officer.

The 4 Types of Teams All Leaders Need to Understand

First Friday Book Synopsis

Here is an article written by Thomas A. Stewart for BNET, The CBS Interactive Business Network. To check out an abundance of valuable resources and obtain a free subscription to one or more of the BNET newsletters, please click here. * * * You saw it last night: UConn’s Kemba Walker is the best college [.].

A vast treasure of intellectual capital awaits you….

First Friday Book Synopsis

Bob's blog entries A vast treasure of intellectual capital awaits you Better Protection for U.S. The Innovator's DNA The Progress Principle The Secret Weapon of Great Leaders Think Like an Innovator Tom Malone University of Oxford's Saïd Business School What Capitalism Can Learn from the NFL Wise Leadership

Social, baby boomers and the brain drain

Chartered Management Institute

Knowledge sits at the heart of our modern economy, so the thought of large chunks of our intellectual capital walking out of the door should be enough to alarm any manager. It’s estimated that nearly 40% of the working population is over 45, and whilst these baby boomers have contributed tremendously to both the economy and their employers, the risk posed by the loss of their knowledge from the workplace is considerable.

Leadership: Collaboration

Coaching Tip

The new currency isn’t intellectual capital. It is social capital –the collective value of who we know and what we’ll do for each other. James M.

Rising to the Challenge Before Us – LEADING FORWARD

Jesse Lyn Stoner Blog

Great leaders have always recognized and developed their intellectual capital, emotional and spiritual capital, because they recognized that being just smart was not enough, being just heart centered was not enough, and being just values driven was not enough.

Guest Blogger @KateNasser - Leaders & Teams: Do You Buoy Each Other?

leaderCommunicator

Thank you for respecting intellectual capital. Do you feel unappreciated at work? That doesn''t mean people don''t appreciate you. It means they aren''t expressing appreciation to you. It''s an important distinction. If you believe others don''t appreciate you, you can lose motivation.

Retain Your Top Performers

Marshall Goldsmith

The “intellectual capital” brought in by high-knowledge employees will be a major, if not the primary, competitive advantage. Leaders are debating the changing nature of work and the perceived decline in job security (the lifelong career at a benevolent company is a fading memory) and the erosion of corporate loyalty. Employees are wondering, “If the company is willing to dump me at its convenience, why shouldn’t I dump the company at my convenience?”

Janet Malcolm, The Art of Nonfiction No. 4: An Interview

First Friday Book Synopsis

Not everyone is aware of the fact that there is a wealth of priceless intellectual capital available at the website of The Paris Review. If you are seeking delicious brain food, look no further. Founded in Paris by Harold L. Humes, Peter Matthiessen, and George Plimpton in 1953, The Paris Review began with a simple [.].

How to Navigate a Digital Transformation

Harvard Business Review

An organization is essentially the sum total of its physical, financial, human, intellectual, and relationship capital. Manufacturers invest most of their capital into physical assets, while high-tech firms invest in R&D to create new intellectual capital.

Low-Skilled Workers Everywhere Are Getting Squeezed

Harvard Business Review

To answer those questions, the authors look at the share of value in manufacturing captured by high-skilled workers (those with a college degree or equivalent), medium-skilled workers (high school degree), low-skilled workers (less than high school), and capital.

Ignore Emotional Intelligence at Your Own Risk

Harvard Business Review

And, as the leader of our firm’s management appraisal practice, professional development, and intellectual capital creation, I’ve also carefully studied various assessment approaches and their performance impact. Call it Grant vs. Goleman. Two academic heavyweights face off on a topic that every student of leadership and HR cares — or at least hears — a lot about: emotional intelligence.

Why Leaders Are Still So Hesitant to Invest in New Business Models

Harvard Business Review

Despite the fact that executives could improve the value and performance of their companies by shifting capital from under-performing business units to better performing units, most choose to allocate their resources the same way year after year. According to Ocean Tomo, a consulting firm focused on intellectual capital, physical assets (plant, property, and equipment) made up more than 80% of the market value of the S&P 500 in 1975.

The Corporation is at Odds with the Future

Harvard Business Review

And, if we have the intellectual capital, maybe get a pied-à-terre. A client recently asked me to comment crisply on the future. I came up with these observations. See if you can spot my error. The world is speeding up.

Do You Know What Your Company’s Data Is Worth?

Harvard Business Review

For example, at the end of its 2015 fiscal year, Apple’s balance sheet stated tangible assets of $290 billion as a contribution to its annual revenues, with approximately $141 billion worth of intangible assets — a combination of intellectual capital, brand equity, and (investor and consumer) goodwill. Accurately measuring enterprise value (EV) has never been more important or challenging.

Gloominess About the US Economy is a Choice

Harvard Business Review

What China makes is generally low-priced, with razor-thin profit margins, is available from almost any emerging market supplier, and contains little distinctive or proprietary intellectual capital. What we make is high-priced and highly profitable, contains lots of proprietary and protected intellectual capital, and is often only available from a handful of American firms, sometimes only one.

Bureaucracy Must Die

Harvard Business Review

When a company misses the future, the fault invariably lies with a small cadre of seasoned executives who failed to write off their depreciating intellectual capital. This operational triumph is tempered, though, by Intel’s failure to capitalize on the explosive growth of the market for mobile devices. First, only a minority of the world’s employees work in publicly-held corporations that are subject to the rigors and shortcomings of American-style capitalism.

Why IBM Gives Top Employees a Month to Do Service Abroad

Harvard Business Review

According to Litow, the objective was threefold: to support IBMers in their service engagements, to invest the intellectual capital of IBMers in tackling social issues around the world, and to develop the expertise and leadership of IBMers through volunteer opportunities that leverage their skills and abilities.

Why IBM Gives Top Employees a Month to Do Service Abroad

Harvard Business Review

According to Litow, the objective was threefold: to support IBMers in their service engagements, to invest the intellectual capital of IBMers in tackling social issues around the world, and to develop the expertise and leadership of IBMers through volunteer opportunities that leverage their skills and abilities.

10 Simple Tips To Attract The Best Clients.

Rich Gee Group

Take the necessary steps to grow your clientele — get out and network, reach out via a killer website, thrill people with your abilities, give away your intellectual capital, wear huge holes in your shoes, and lose your voice from all the talking you will do.

The Economic Roots of Your Life Crisis

Harvard Business Review

Today's logic might be summarized thus, as two of my intellectual heroes, Daron Acemoglu and James Robinson, have recently argued in their new book, Why Nations Fail : "Join us — we're here to take advantage of you." Maybe it's time to invest in the soft stuff — people, experiences, ideas, your own human, social, and intellectual capital — instead. I know: it's not manly, dignified, or barely mentionable in polite conversation. But here's the thing.

The Six Attitudes Leaders Take Towards Social Media

Harvard Business Review

Fearful leaders see social media as a threat to productivity, intellectual capital , privacy, management authority, regulatory compliance and a host of other things, and often discourage and even prohibit its use. To keep progressing, leaders should recognize previous successes, capitalize on growing momentum, advocate continued evolution and increase investments.

It’s Not About the Tea

Linked 2 Leadership

But in the increasingly knowledge-based workplace with intellectual capital and more complex tasks that require more than “butts in seats,” leaders must become relationship savvy. As a leader, have you ever been inspired to create positive change in others or in circumstances? Author Greg Mortenson ’s tale of getting lost on his way down the second highest peak in the world know as K2 in Pakistan and finding his calling is a story of leadership inspiration.

Developing Global Leaders Is America's Competitive Advantage

Harvard Business Review

French pharmaceutical company Sanofi recently acquired Boston-based Genzyme to tap into America's intellectual capital in biotechnology. As global companies focus their strategies on developed and emerging markets, they require substantial cadres of leaders capable of operating effectively anywhere in the world. American companies and academic institutions possess unique competitive advantages in developing these global leaders.

Most Organizations Still Fear Social Media

Harvard Business Review

Most organizations, however, still view social media as a threat to productivity, intellectual capital, security, privacy, management authority, or regulatory compliance. In just a few years, social media has come to dominate many of our personal communications. We collaborate daily, sometimes productively, sometimes not.

The Boomers are Leaving! – How to Create and Implement a Knowledge.

Strategy Driven

Inside you’ll find scenarios, case studies, tips, templates, and checklists that will help you capture and retain your company’s intellectual capital as Baby Boomers leave the workplace. The baby boomers have gained so much intellectually.

The Boomers are Leaving! – How to Create and Implement a Knowledge.

Strategy Driven

Inside you’ll find scenarios, case studies, tips, templates, and checklists that will help you capture and retain your company’s intellectual capital as Baby Boomers leave the workplace.

CEOs Need Hard Data on Customer Loyalty

Harvard Business Review

Three-quarters of the world's CEOs say more emphasis should be placed on measuring the value of non-financial assets such as intellectual capital and customer relationships. This was the headline finding of a recent study (PDF) by the American Institute of CPAs and the Chartered Institute of Management Accountants. Considering the sponsors, it's sort of like the Army reporting that what we really need is more battleships. Unexpected, to say the least.

Bureaucracy Must Die

Harvard Business Review

When a company misses the future, the fault invariably lies with a small cadre of seasoned executives who failed to write off their depreciating intellectual capital. This operational triumph is tempered, though, by Intel’s failure to capitalize on the explosive growth of the market for mobile devices. First, only a minority of the world’s employees work in publicly-held corporations that are subject to the rigors and shortcomings of American-style capitalism.

Can HP Change its DNA?

Harvard Business Review

It governs an organization's cultivation of its intellectual capital—how it leverages what it already knows how to do, and how it evolves its offering based on changing market demands. Companies that focus on hardware first can usually understand the economics of software intellectually, but at the day-to-day organizational level they don't act as though they get them.

All Hail the Failure Sector

Harvard Business Review

So the sector features venture capital, which has grown from being an obscure corner of the financial industry to being its most potent part in terms of funding economic growth. The sector has entities, too, to improve the flow of intellectual capital. And it's an ingenious innovation that allows the economy to explore the new while exploiting the large-scale capital—human, physical, financial, social—already invested in the functioning economy.

Can Hewlett Packard Make its Own Luck?

Harvard Business Review

One good approach would be to find new ways for its partners to leverage HP's intellectual capital in their marketing and selling efforts. It just needs to think hard, and think as one, about the smartest future for HP and how to get there — and then capitalize on whatever luck comes its way. HP finds itself in a complicated position.

The Tempting of Rajat Gupta

Harvard Business Review

McKinsey responded that it was actually investing more on intellectual capital, but on the industry-specific variety of more use to consultants and clients.) Walter Kiechel III is the former Editorial Director of Harvard Business Publishing, former Managing Editor at Fortune magazine, and author of The Lords of Strategy: The Secret Intellectual History of the New Corporate World.