Vulnerability & Trust - A Leader's Paradox

Mills Scofield

Join Deb Mills-Scofield and her incredible guests, John Hagel , Co-Chair, Center for the Edge at Deloitte, Saul Kaplan , Founder & Chief Catalyst at Business Innovation Factory and Mike Wait e, President of Menasha Packaging , as we discuss how showing your vulnerability generates trust, empowers your people to be free to innovate, take smart risks, and discover hard to access tacit knowledge, needed more than ever in our era of Big Data.

Gary Klein: An interview by Bob Morris

First Friday Book Synopsis

He also developed methods of Cognitive Task Analysis for uncovering the tacit knowledge that goes into decision […]. Gary Klein, Ph.D., is a Senior Scientist at MacroCognition, LLC. He was instrumental in founding the field of Naturalistic Decision Making. ?He He developed a Recognition-Primed Decision (RPD) model to describe how people actually make decisions in natural settings.

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Help Employees Create Knowledge — Not Just Share It

Harvard Business

Many leaders see organizational learning simply as sharing existing knowledge. This view of learning was the key driver of “knowledge management systems” that came into vogue in the 1990’s. These systems sought to make existing knowledge more accessible to those who might need it in the form of knowledge repositories that collected and indexed documents as well as directories of expertise that could point employees to others who had relevant know-how.

How Women of Color Get to Senior Management

Harvard Business

Having influential senior leaders — including men as well as women of color — serve as mentors, advisers, and role models provided emerging women managers with the tacit knowledge needed to navigate their company’s leadership structure. Jorg Greuel/Getty Images. Women of color are a force in the U.S. economy. They are projected to make up the majority of all women by 2060, which means they’ll also likely become the majority of the U.S. workforce.

How to Successfully Work Across Countries, Languages, and Cultures

Harvard Business

The CEO, Hiroshi Mikitani, realized that doing business in multiple languages prevented the organization from sharing valuable knowledge across the organization’s existing global operations, as well as those that were being newly established. Interactions are also vital for sharing knowledge across sites. Photo by Christine Roy. According to a recent McKinsey Global Institute report , the number of people in the global labor force will reach 3.5

Stop Obsessing Over Intellectual Property Rights

Harvard Business Review

While seeking intellectual property rights (IPR) is entirely appropriate for your well-structured knowledge, putting serious effort into mapping the deep, implicit knowledge within your organization can prove equally valuable. Exploiting this deep knowledge entails strategically mapping the know-how usually just carried in the heads of individual employees, or by groups of your employees working together, in tacit, interpersonal organizational routines.

How Fear Helps (and Hurts) Entrepreneurs

Harvard Business

Intuition is a potent source of information, and research has demonstrated that among experts, tacit knowledge and gut instinct lead to rapid and effective decision-making. This might be for core knowledge, such as computer coding skills on the part of the software entrepreneur seeking financing, or learning to cope with the high pace of activities that most entrepreneurs experience. MirageC/Getty Images.

The Boomers are Leaving! – How to Create and Implement a Knowledge.

Strategy Driven

– How to Create and Implement a Knowledge Transfer Program, part 1 Posted by Ken Ball and Gina Gotsill on November 10, 2010 · 2 Comments The clock is ticking: next year, in 2011, the oldest of the 76 million Baby Boomers turn 65. But when they do leave, they will take with them years of institutional knowledge acquired on the job. Keeping this a low priority could lead to a great deal of deep, tacit knowledge walking out the door, maybe for good.

Your Whole Company Needs to Be Distinctive, Not Just Your Product

Harvard Business

Make tacit knowledge explicit by codifying the things you do in capabilities, but keep rethinking, improving, and reworking your codification. Ever since the idea of strategy came to the business world in the early 1960s, the goal of differentiation has been paramount. Customers choose the company that gives them value that other companies can’t match.

IAM 35

The Boomers are Leaving! – How to Create and Implement a Knowledge.

Strategy Driven

– How to Create and Implement a Knowledge Transfer Program, part 2 Posted by Ken Ball and Gina Gotsill on November 17, 2010 · 2 Comments Now that you’ve looked at your workforce (in The Boomers are Leaving! – How to Create and Implement a Knowledge Transfer Program, part 1 ), you’re ready to design and develop a program that retains Baby Boomers’ knowledge. Regularly ask yourself these questions: Who will receive the knowledge?

The MBA M-Prize's Winning Hack

Harvard Business Review

Both Roth and Tandon had worked as management consultants before seeking their MBAs, and they understand that tacit knowledge is critical for professional service companies. They also recognize that these organizations usually lose a lot of tacit knowledge because employees infrequently intersect with one another, and because time pressures in a projects-based world erode organizational insights.

Are You Wasting Money On Useless Knowledge Management?

Harvard Business Review

Is your company investing in expensive knowledge management systems that are useless for making big, strategy decisions? Most companies recognize the need for knowledge management, but often delegate it to the IT and HR departments without linking it to corporate strategy, often thereby wasting both resources and the strategic options their firm's knowledge could generate. In our simplified format, knowledge assets map along two dimensions. Knowledge management SMK

Executive Education Is Ripe for Online Disruption

Harvard Business Review

Second, to fully appreciate the forces at work in executive education, we need to complement this view with another body of theory from knowledge management. Education is basically that — knowledge sharing. and I wrote a much-cited HBR article a decade ago where we argued that different kinds of knowledge require different kinds of sharing approaches. We called it a codification strategy to knowledge sharing.

Algorithms Make Better Predictions — Except When They Don’t

Harvard Business

Further, algorithms cannot (yet, anyway) tap intuition — the soft factors that are not data inputs, the tacit knowledge that experienced managers deploy every day, nor the creative genius of innovators. Predictive analytics is proving itself both powerful and perilous. Powerful, because advanced algorithms can take a near-unlimited number of factors into account, provide deep insights into variation, and scale to meet the needs of even the largest company.

With New York Schools Appointment, Bloomberg Did it His Way

Harvard Business Review

The other challenge is the amount of tacit knowledge involved in improving the performance of large systems — insight and understanding not easily captured or conveyed by numbers, formulas, or recipes. By definition, tacit knowledge comes with time — so outsiders must approach organizations with humility. Mayor Michael Bloomberg is getting his way and Cathleen Black will take over from Joel Klein as Chancellor of New York City Schools.

What Tesla Knows That Other Patent-Holders Don’t

Harvard Business Review

There’s a lot of thinking in the research these days on the gap between the codified knowledge that is patentable and gets disclosed versus tacit knowledge that really exists in how you actually produce,” says Orly Lobel, a law professor at the University of San Diego specializing in intellectual property. It’s something different from just the aggregation of the knowledge in the patents.”.

We Learn More When We Learn Together

Harvard Business Review

However, we don’t need to learn with others in formal training or development programs: we can architect our own opportunities to gain insight, knowledge, and skills that move us on an upward trajectory. We grow in high-quality connections because our thinking is broadened, we absorb knowledge more quickly, our action repertoire is expanded, and we are more engaged, playful, open, and resilient in the face of setbacks. dave wheeler FOR HBR. We rarely grow alone.

How to Bring in a New CEO for Your Startup

Harvard Business Review

Ensure knowledge capture and transfer. A critical factor in managing this transition is ensuring that relevant knowledge is documented to the greatest extent possible. Founders hold vast amounts of information in their heads, and when they hand over the reins, the new team can experience a knowledge gap. Knowledge capture and transfer will assist in a smooth transition.

The Limits of 3D Printing

Harvard Business Review

Both steps require tacit knowledge. Contrary to what some say , 3D printing is not going to revolutionize the manufacturing sector, rendering traditional factories obsolete. The simple fact of the matter is the economics of 3D printing now and for the foreseeable future make it an unfeasible way to produce the vast majority of parts manufactured today.

Structure Your Global Team for Innovation

Harvard Business Review

But single-location projects draw on a reservoir or shared tacit knowledge and trust that global projects lack. When the knowledge base underlying a project is fragmented and project teams are scattered over multiple locations, miscommunication, conflict, and stalemates over crucial decision making are much more likely. Many firms struggle to exploit the innovation potential of their global networks. That's partly because they manage global projects like traditional ones.

Structure Your Global Team for Innovation

Harvard Business Review

But single-location projects draw on a reservoir or shared tacit knowledge and trust that global projects lack. When the knowledge base underlying a project is fragmented and project teams are scattered over multiple locations, miscommunication, conflict, and stalemates over crucial decision making are much more likely. Many firms struggle to exploit the innovation potential of their global networks. That's partly because they manage global projects like traditional ones.

Engage Your Long-Time Employees to Improve Performance

Harvard Business Review

In today’s knowledge-based economy, companies and products are intricately specialized and experience counts for a lot. Tenure matters not only because years of work in a given profession yield deep specialist knowledge. Through countless hours of collaboration with the same coworkers and teams, veteran employees gain tacit knowledge that allows them to predict how colleagues will behave and anticipate how they will respond to everyday situations.

Facebook Changes Upend Advertiser and Agency Models

Harvard Business Review

Even when optimizing to a transaction, they do so with tacit knowledge of what each transaction is worth. The media is already dissecting yesterday's Facebook event, where the company unveiled major new changes to their platform. Par for the course, really. Drama always accompanies any change to the Facebook site or platform.

The Trouble with Mary Chen

Harvard Business Review

Hall calls "high-context" cultures, like China, people tend to leave much unsaid in their communication, because they assume a lot of tacit knowledge and understanding (the context). Chinese managers and owners in Chinese-owned businesses play by the same rules.

Why Staff Turnover in the White House Is Such a Bad Thing — Especially For President Trump

Harvard Business

The members of high performance teams have a high level of tacit knowledge about one another — in other words, they understand each other on a personal level that stretches far beyond knowledge of each other’s resumes. Martin Barraud/Getty Images. The Trump Administration has a historically unprecedented rate of turnover of the senior staff, and it shows no sign of abating. This level of disruption would be difficult for any organization to handle.

Case Study: Will Our Chinese Partner Copy Our Technology?

Harvard Business Review

For another, Prime had embedded a great deal of "tacit knowledge" into some of the components — knowledge that was more "know why" than pure know-how. Hoping to give him a chance to show off his knowledge, Lin encouraged the Blue Sky engineers to ask questions about Prime's technology. In addition to being highly efficient, the prototype was a marvel of embedded tacit knowledge. One person wasn't smiling.

Algorithms Make Better Predictions — Except When They Don’t

Harvard Business Review

Further, algorithms cannot (yet, anyway) tap intuition — the soft factors that are not data inputs, the tacit knowledge that experienced managers deploy every day, nor the creative genius of innovators. Predictive analytics is proving itself both powerful and perilous. Powerful, because advanced algorithms can take a near-unlimited number of factors into account, provide deep insights into variation, and scale to meet the needs of even the largest company.

Even in a Digital World, Globalization Is Not Inevitable

Harvard Business

Think of tacit knowledge, which John Hagel III and John Seely Brown, who have thought deeply about information flows, argue is increasing rather than decreasing in value. In the aftermath of the UK’s Brexit vote and Donald Trump’s election in the U.S., globalization is seen as a political hot potato rather than a hot ticket to prosperity.

Getting Smarter about Google's "Brain Drain"

Harvard Business Review

In his signature style, Gladwell drew on social-science research that documents the importance of practical skills ("tacit knowledge") over raw brainpower, how individuals who think they're smarter than others (and get treated that way) tend to worry more about acting smart than learning new things, and the dangers of what three psychologists have called "the dark side of charisma.".