Use Tension and Conflict to Create Breakthrough Products

Harvard Business Review

The project demanded rethinking the entire concept of what automotive luxury performance meant. I''ve written before about the science that helps explain why and how constraints and limits, often in the form of intelligent, well-set stretch goals, result in more creative solutions.

As Emerging Markets Slow, Firms Search for “New” BRICs

Harvard Business Review

Real increases in personal income and access to credit will support growth across all retail categories, but the automotive, consumer electronics, and food and drink sectors will outperform, as consumer taste becomes more sophisticated. The region has piqued executives’ interest, as it benefits from improving business conditions, demand for infrastructure projects, and a strong demographic profile. By all measures, emerging markets are having a tough year.

GDP 12

How to Compete Like the World’s Most Innovative Leaders

Skip Prichard

I think the most important thing that I look for [when funding a project] is really, who’s that champion?” It’s a hard topic to study because of all of the intangibles that go into convincing and persuading others to bring resources to your innovation projects.

How CMOs Can Get CFOs on Their Side

Harvard Business Review

Just 36 percent of CMOs, for example, have quantitatively proven the short-term impact of marketing spend, according to the 2013 CMO Survey (and for demonstrating long-term impact, that figure drops to 32 percent). Moreover, the previous year’s survey showed that 63 percent of projects do not use analytics to inform marketing decisions. Marketing is in the midst of an ROI revolution.

CFO 12

Priorities for Jumpstarting the U.S. Industrial Economy

Harvard Business Review

industries: 35 advanced manufacturing industries such as automotive and aerospace manufacturing, pharmaceuticals and semiconductors; three energy industries including electric power generation; and 12 service industries, from software design to telecommunications.

The Key to Change Is Middle Management

Harvard Business Review

doubled from 20% to 40% between July and December 2013, and has stayed at that level since. I studied large-scale change and innovation efforts in 56 randomly selected companies in the high-tech, retail, pharmaceutical, banking, automotive, insurance, energy, non-profit, and health care industries. The permitting time has since been nearly halved for key pilot projects.