To Stay Relevant, Your Company and Employees Must Keep Learning

Harvard Business Review

As AT&T CEO and Chair Randall Stephenson, recently told the New York Times, “There is a need to retool yourself, and you should not expect to stop… People who do not spend five to 10 hours a week in online learning will obsolete themselves with the technology.”

When Will this Low-Innovation Internet Era End?

Harvard Business Review

It's an age of unprecedented, staggering technological change. Then there's another view, which I heard from author Neal Stephenson in an MIT lecture hall last week. Stephenson was clearly trying to be provocative. Gordon's productivity research.) but the emerging markets boom has generally been more about catching up than exploiting cutting-edge technology.). Even beyond the technological challenges, there are lots of other obstacles to change.

Why Business Leaders Need to Read More Science Fiction

Harvard Business Review

Extrapolating from past trends is useful but limiting in a world of accelerating technological change. Neal Stephenson’s The Diamond Age inspired Jeff Bezos to create the Kindle ; Sergey Brin mines Stephenson’s even more famous Snow Crash for insights into virtual reality. They make us more efficient and productive. At the end of the 19th century, New York City stank.

The Stakeholders You Need to Close a Big Deal

Harvard Business Review

OnLive’s product enabled high-end video games to be hosted in the cloud and played from any device. Cool new technology, new market for AT&T, competitive pressure, etc. Regardless of where they started their careers, most decision makers spend the majority of their days dealing with macro issues and are unlikely to have the expertise required to have a detailed understanding of your company or product. The decision maker at AT&T was CEO Randall Stephenson.

The 3 Things CEOs Worry About the Most

Harvard Business Review

Randall Stephenson of AT&T explained, “We had 270,000 people we employed around the globe. CEOs have a lot to worry about, but what are their greatest concerns? What keeps them awake at night?

Winning the Elusive Marquee-Brand Customer Advocate

Harvard Business Review

The marketing head of an ambitious technology firm recently shared with me a vexing problem: Apple was one of their customers. As Michael Stephenson , a key leader in global customer programs at Oracle puts it, his firm has various business units that focus on specific industries. But the executive and her team could essentially tell no one. The restrictions that Apple placed on them were that airtight.