First Look: Leadership Books for December 2013

Leading Blog

Boards That Lead : When to Take Charge, When to Partner, and When to Stay Out of the Way by Ram Charan, Dennis Carey and Michael Useem. Here''s a look at some of the best leadership books to be released in December. Hacking Leadership : The 11 Gaps Every Business Needs to Close and the Secrets to Closing Them Quickly by Mike Myatt. Lead & Influence : Get More Ownership, Commitment, and Achievement From Your Team by Mark Fritz.

Books 236

First Look: Leadership Books for February 2013

Leading Blog

Global Tilt : Leading Your Business Through the Great Economic Power Shift by Ram Charan. Here's a look at some of the best leadership books to be released in February. Leadership Conversations : Challenging High Potential Managers to Become Great Leaders by Alan S. Berson and Richard G. Stieglitz. Playing to Win : How Strategy Really Works by A.G. Lafley and Roger L. Martin.

Books 237

30 Books in 30 days – Remembering 15 years of the 1st Friday Book Synopsis – (Execution by Larry Bossidy and Ram Charan)

First Friday Book Synopsis

{On April 5, 2013, we will celebrate the 15th Anniversary of the First Friday Book Synopsis, and begin our 16th year. During March, I will post a blog post per day remembering key insights from some of the books I have presented over the 15 years of the First Friday Book Synopsis. We have met [.]. Randy's blog entries

Playing to Win: A book review by Bob Morris

First Friday Book Synopsis

Lafley and Roger Martin Harvard Business Review Press (2013) “The essence of strategy is choosing what not to do.” Lafley has co-authored another book, with Roger Martin, after previously co-authoring The Game Changer with Ram Charan. Playing to Win: How Strategy Really Works A.G. ” — Michael Porter I am pleased that A.G. Whereas in the [.].

Blogging on Business Update from Bob Morris (Week of 2/25/13)

First Friday Book Synopsis

I hope that at least a few of these recent posts will be of interest to you: BOOK REVIEWS Global Tilt: Leading Your Business Through the Great Economic Power Shift Ram Charan The AIG Story Maurice R. Greenberg and Lawrence Cunningham Global Tilt: Leading Your Business Through the Great Economic Power Shift Ram Charan HBR’s [.].

Blog 79

HBR’s 10 Must Reads On Making Smart Decisions: A book review by Bob Morris

First Friday Book Synopsis

HBR’s 10 Must Reads on Making Smart Decisions Various Contributors with Editors of Harvard Business Review Harvard Business Review Press (2013) Learn why bad decisions happen to good managers — and how to make better ones This is one in a series of volumes that anthologizes what the editors of the Harvard Business Review consider [.].

Blogging on Business Update from Bob Morris (Week of 1/21/13)

First Friday Book Synopsis

Chaney Josh Linkner Karen Firestone Krish Krishnakanthan LinkedIn Making internal collaboration work: An interview with Don Tapscott Management Tip of the Day Maria Konnikova Mastermind Mel Brooks: “Unhinged” and Loving It Nationa Geographic Society NPR PBS Ram Charan Renee Montagne Rik Kirkland Robert S.

Blog 85

My 12 “Must Read” Best Leadership Books for 2014

The Empowered Buisness

Ram Charan is an advisor to senior executives with insight into why some companies are successful and others not. With the new year coming, I asked myself … what wisdom could I provide to help leaders change their game in 2014?

Books 141

What the Best Decision Makers Do

Harvard Business Review

Ram Charan , coauthor of Boards that Lead , talks about what he’s learned in three decades of helping executives make tough decisions. Download this podcast. Boards Decision making Leadership

The Three Decisions You Need to Own

Harvard Business Review

This article is adapted from the HBR interview with Ram Charan, You Can’t Be a Wimp, Make the Tough Calls found in the November 2013 issue of HBR. CEOs face countless decisions. The best executives understand which ones they need to focus on and which ones they can delegate.

Ten Essential Tips for Hiring Your Next CEO

Harvard Business Review

Ram Charan, Dennis Carey, and Michael Useem are co-authors of the book Boards That Lead: When to Take Charge, When to Partner, and When to Stay Out of the Way , (HBR Press 2014). Selecting a new chief executive is critical because so much rides on a positive outcome.

Leaders, Choose Your Words Wisely

Harvard Business Review

My professor, Ram Charan, noticed that my schoolwork was starting to slip. Even a brief interaction can change the way people think about themselves, their leaders, and the future.

Research: What CEOs Really Want from Coaching

Harvard Business Review

But Jack Welch is another prominent example of a top business leader who worked with an advisor — Ram Charan — for many years. Two-thirds of CEOs don''t receive any outside advice on their leadership skills, and yet almost all would be receptive to suggestions from a coach.

Microsoft’s Next CEO: How the Board Can Get It Right

Harvard Business Review

Ram Charan, Dennis Carey, and Michael Useem are authors of Boards That Lead: When to Take Charge, When to Partner, and When to Stay Out of the Way , 2014. Face facts: Most boards invest heavily in executive assessments, exposing chief-executive candidates to C-suite responsibilities and checking their P&L performance — while simultaneously scanning outside prospects.

Ideation and Entrepreneurship: Interview with Liz Alexander and Naveen Lakkur

QAspire

Liz Alexander (who I interviewed in 2013 on the topic of thought leadership ) and Naveen Lakkur (Director, Founder Institute, India) wrote a new book titled “ FOUND – Transforming Your Unlimited Ideas Into One Sustainable Business ”.

Developing a Leadership Training Program for High Potentials: A Case Study

Great Leadership By Dan

The Leadership Pipeline: How to Build the Leadership-Powered Company , Authors: Ram Charan, Stephen Drotter, James Noel; Publisher: Jossey-Bass, 2001. She is currently President of the PMI® Mass Bay Chapter Board of Directors (2011 – 2013).

What It Will Take to Fix HR

Harvard Business Review

In the July/August issue of HBR , Ram Charan argues that the Chief Human Resources Officer (CHRO) role should be eliminated, with HR responsibilities funneled in two separate directions — administration , led by traditional HR-types, reporting to the CFO; and talent strategy , led by high-potential line managers, reporting to the corner office. So, kudos to Charan for starting the conversation.

CFO 12

How Boards Can Innovate

Harvard Business Review

To that end, Diebold recruited a new CEO in 2013, Andy W. Dennis Carey, Ram Charan, and Michael Useem are offering a two-day program on “Boards That Lead” at Wharton Executive Education on June 16-17, 2014. More blog posts by Michael Useem , Dennis Carey and Ram Charan.

It’s Not HR’s Job to Be Strategic

Harvard Business Review

A few months ago, Ram Charan proposed splitting HR into two parts: one to oversee leadership and organization, and one to handle administration. Indeed, according to the Association for Talent Development, nearly 40% of corporate training in 2013 was delivered through technology, and that number is projected to grow.

If the Board Monitors the Company, Who Monitors the Board?

Harvard Business Review

By 2013, that fixed portion had dropped from 63 to 16 percent while the incentive fraction soared from 17 to 66 percent. Ram Charan, Dennis Carey, and Michael Useem are offering a two-day program on “Boards That Lead” at Wharton Executive Education on June 16-17, 2014. With equity holdings of major firms now in the hands of a relatively small set of mega-holders, big investors have helped rejuvenate the boardroom.

An Activist Investor Lands in Your Boardroom — Now What?

Harvard Business Review

More than 200 activist-investor initiatives hit companies in 2013, a seven-fold increase over a decade earlier. Dennis Carey and Michael Useem are co-authors with Ram Charan of Boards That Lead: When to Take Charge, When to Partner, and When to Stay Out of the Way , HBR Press, 2014 Activist investors, though neither barbarians at the gates nor corporate raiders, can still seem very unwelcome.