Employee Engagement: 2010 Research Insights

Michael Lee Stallard

In July, Hewitt released a report showing that for the quarter ending June 2010, 46 percent of the 900 organizations it tracks experienced declines in employee engagement versus 30 percent of the organizations that experienced improved employee engagement.

Leadership, Employee Engagement and Innovation at BIF-6 Summit

Michael Lee Stallard

After taking a couple days to mull it over I’ve decided to select a few presentations that will be most relevant to the themes I typically write and speak about i.e. leadership, connection, employee engagement, productivity and innovation.

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What matters in 2010?

Lead on Purpose

What matters in 2010? Filed under: Leadership , Techology Tagged: | 2010 , attention , commitment , energy , focus , Gov2.0 , influence , Seth Godin « The price of leadership Five myths about leadership » Like Be the first to like this post.

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Lessons from the Best Global Brands 2010: Building trust and.

Strategy Driven

Figure 1: The Interbrand Best 100 Global Brands 2010 A look at two brands’ performances from this year’s table offers insight into how brands can navigate today’s marketplace. which resulted in an increase in brand awareness of 72 percent between 2004 and 2010.

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BIF-6: Stunning Sights, Interesting People, Innovative Ideas

Michael Lee Stallard

Michael Lee Stallard Insights on Leadership and Employee Engagement Home About Hire to Speak Press Kit BIF-6: Stunning Sights, Interesting People, Innovative Ideas Published by Michael Lee Stallard on September 15, 2010 06:16 pm under connection culture Life is good!

Statesman vs. Politician | N2Growth Blog

N2Growth Blog

This is the distinction between what he terms the 'Character Ethic' vs the 'Personality Ethic' The prior depends on deep changes within each of us including our view of creating a legacy for future generations.

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Best Posts on Leadership from Top Bloggers

Michael Lee Stallard

Here’s what Dan wrote about it: Welcome to the September 5th, 2010 Leadership Development Carnival Back to Football edition! Meta Log in Entries RSS Comments RSS WordPress.org Copyright © 2010 Michael Lee Stallard

Loyalty vs. Tenure | N2Growth Blog

N2Growth Blog

Tenure Inhibits Change and Cripples Innovation : Organizations that favor tenure also tend to be prone to majoring in the minors. All of these traits preclude the advancement of change initiatives and cripple innovation.

8 Traits of Ineffective Leaders | N2Growth Blog

N2Growth Blog

The best leaders are focused on leading change and innovation to keep their organizations fresh, dynamic and growing. They find ways to consistently engage them and incorporate them into their innovation and planning initiatives. link] Links for May 16 2010 — Eric D.

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Guest Post: 10 Secrets of Effective Leaders

Lead on Purpose

Be innovative. You’ll be seen as an innovator and not just someone who goes along with the group. 4: Being innovative ties closely with understanding your markets; be the market expert for your product line. #9:

Bonus or No Bonus? | N2Growth Blog

N2Growth Blog

Posted on November 29th, 2010 by admin in Miscellaneous , Operations & Strategy , Talent Management By Mike Myatt , Chief Strategy Officer, N2growth Bonus or no bonus? I personally dont feel bonuses work to promote a good work ethic.

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Trust

Lead on Purpose

Home About the Blog Michael’s Bio Resources Lead on Purpose Entries RSS | Comments RSS Top Posts Lead on Purpose featured Five leadership practices for improving customer service Five factors of leadership Real-world examples of customer service Leadership and Product Management Five stages of problem solving Guest Post: The Yin-Yang of Product Management -- Market Sensing Book Review: The Leader Who had no Title Market sensing Product manager responsibilities Recent Comments Doug Taylor on Guest Post: 10 Secrets of Effective Leaders Michael Ray Hopkin on Ethics and family values Yetta Korwatch on Ethics and family values Essential Pieces for Strategic Product Leadership « Where the Product Management Tribe Gathers on Leadership and Product Management Essential Pieces for Strategic Product Leadership « Where the Product Management Tribe Gathers on Michael’s Bio Archives December 2010 November 2010 October 2010 September 2010 August 2010 July 2010 June 2010 May 2010 April 2010 March 2010 February 2010 January 2010 December 2009 November 2009 October 2009 September 2009 August 2009 July 2009 June 2009 May 2009 April 2009 March 2009 February 2009 January 2009 December 2008 November 2008 October 2008 September 2008 August 2008 July 2008 June 2008 May 2008 April 2008 March 2008 February 2008 January 2008 December 2007 Trust Posted on March 30, 2010 by Michael Ray Hopkin The recent theme at Lead on Purpose is trust. This focus has come primarily from reading The Speed of Trust by Stephen M.R. Covey. He discusses the concept of building a trust account, which is similar to a bank account. By behaving in ways that build trust you make deposits, by behaving in ways that destroy trust you make withdrawals. The ‘balance’ in the account reflects the amount of trust you have at any given time. You have a unique trust account with every person you know, and all deposits and withdrawals are not created equal. Trust is built or destroyed by behaviors. Covey teaches 13 Behaviors of high-trust people and leaders worldwide. These behaviors will increase trust and improve your ability to interact effectively with people in every aspect of your life. Here are the behaviors that will help you build trust: Talk Straight: Be honest. Tell the truth. Let people know where you stand. Demonstrate Respect: Genuinely care for others. Respect the dignity of every person and every role. Create Transparency: Tell the truth in a way people can verify. Get real and genuine. Be open and authentic. Right Wrongs: Make things right when you’re wrong. Apologize quickly. Make restitution where possible. Show Loyalty: Give credit to others. Speak about people as if they were present. Represent others who aren’t there to speak for themselves. Deliver Results: Establish a track record of results. Get the right things done. Make things happen. Get Better: Continuously improve. Increase your capabilities. Be a constant learner. Confront Reality: Take issues head on, even the “undiscussables.&# Address the tough stuff directly. Acknowledge the unsaid. Clarify Expectations: Disclose and reveal expectations. Discuss them. Validate them. Renegotiate them if needed and possible. Practice Accountability: Hold yourself accountable. Hold others accountable. Take responsibility for results. Listen First: Listen before you speak. Understand. Diagnose. Listen with your ears…and your eyes and heart. Keep Commitments: Say what you’re going to do, then do it. Make commitments carefully and keep them at all costs. Extend Trust: Demonstrate a propensity to trust. Extend trust abundantly to those who have earned your trust. Extend trust conditionally to those who are earning your trust. Mastering the 13 behaviors requires a combination of character and competence. You can (and should) work to improve your abilities in each of these areas. Focus on the ones you consider to be your weaknesses and take the attitude that you will improve. Building trust is not something that happens overnight. As Warren Buffet said: “It takes twenty years to build your reputation and five minutes to ruin it.&# Study these principles, then master them. Study Covey’s book and practice the principles he so eloquently teaches. Every aspect of your life will improve. – The Product Management Perspective: Trust is the most important characteristic a product manager can possess. To effectively work with development, sales and other teams in your organization you must gain their trust. Trust is key to understanding your customers and your market. Trust is a two-way street: you need to carry out your tasks in such a way that the team members will trust you. You also need to trust that the team members will do what they have committed to do. The 13 behaviors listed above provide an excellent roadmap to developing and extending trust with others. Possibly related posts: (automatically generated) Trust and credibility Book Review: Trust Agents Trust – the key to success The 5 Character Traits to Accelerate Trust Filed under: Integrity , Leadership , Trust Tagged: | behavior , character , competence , honesty , loyalty , respect , results , Speed of Trust , Stephen M.R. Covey « Credit comes later Leadership and persistence » Like Be the first to like this post. Leave a Reply Cancel reply Lead on Purpose Top leadership blogs Blogroll Lead on Purpose: How Product Managers Lead Teams to Success Leadership / Executive Strategy Great Leadership M-Power – Harnessing the Power of the Mind Management Excellence by Art Petty Quantum Leaders Sanborn and Associates Marketing Hubspot Seth Godin Web Ink Now Product Management / Marketing How To Be A Good Product Manager On Product Management Pragmatic Marketing Product Management Tips Product Management Tribe Product Management View Product Marketing Blog Strategic Product Manager The Product Management View The Productologist Tyner Blain z-Alltop Sundry Kirk Weisler – T4D Live on Purpose Radio Twitter Categories Innovation (12) Integrity (33) Knowledge (63) Leadership (206) Learning (60) Market-driven (50) Product Management / Marketing (135) Purpose (64) Speed Reading (2) Team Building (48) Techology (30) Trust (79) Uncategorized (2) Blog at WordPress.com. Theme: Digg 3 Column by WP Designer.

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Vision vs. Mission | N2Growth Blog

N2Growth Blog

Our responsibility is to respect the ethic. Furthermore, the enduring anchor of an organization is found in its values and ethics, not its mission. While values and ethics remain consistent, delivery models must change with time to in order to endure.

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Servant Leaders Outperform Because They Connect

Michael Lee Stallard

4 Comments so far Brian Oates on October 18th, 2010 Interesting to see this happen in the military which seeped in a couple hundred years of tradition. Michael Lee Stallard on October 19th, 2010 Brian, It can indeed!

Do Women Bring More Happiness to Families, Greater Effectiveness.

Michael Lee Stallard

Meta Log in Entries RSS Comments RSS WordPress.org Copyright © 2010 Michael Lee StallardMichael Lee Stallard Insights on Leadership and Employee Engagement Home About Hire to Speak Press Kit Do Women Bring More Happiness to Families, Greater Effectiveness to Organizations?

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Brain Research: To Improve Learning, Use Whole Mind

Michael Lee Stallard

2 Comments so far davidburkus on July 18th, 2010 Interesting stuff. Michael Lee Stallard on July 18th, 2010 David, Thanks for visiting my blog. Meta Log in Entries RSS Comments RSS WordPress.org Copyright © 2010 Michael Lee Stallard

Five questions to ask each week

Lead on Purpose

6 Responses Roger Crum , on June 4, 2010 at 7:22 pm said: Excellent question that each move us to add positive value and change in our lives.Thank you. Reply Michael Ray Hopkin , on June 19, 2010 at 10:17 pm said: Roger, glad to hear your enjoyed this post.

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Book Review: The Leader Who had no Title

Lead on Purpose

Home About the Blog Michael’s Bio Resources Lead on Purpose Entries RSS | Comments RSS Top Posts Lead on Purpose featured Five leadership practices for improving customer service Five factors of leadership Real-world examples of customer service Leadership and Product Management Five stages of problem solving Guest Post: The Yin-Yang of Product Management -- Market Sensing Book Review: The Leader Who had no Title Market sensing Product manager responsibilities Recent Comments Doug Taylor on Guest Post: 10 Secrets of Effective Leaders Michael Ray Hopkin on Ethics and family values Yetta Korwatch on Ethics and family values Essential Pieces for Strategic Product Leadership « Where the Product Management Tribe Gathers on Leadership and Product Management Essential Pieces for Strategic Product Leadership « Where the Product Management Tribe Gathers on Michael’s Bio Archives December 2010 November 2010 October 2010 September 2010 August 2010 July 2010 June 2010 May 2010 April 2010 March 2010 February 2010 January 2010 December 2009 November 2009 October 2009 September 2009 August 2009 July 2009 June 2009 May 2009 April 2009 March 2009 February 2009 January 2009 December 2008 November 2008 October 2008 September 2008 August 2008 July 2008 June 2008 May 2008 April 2008 March 2008 February 2008 January 2008 December 2007 Book Review: The Leader Who had no Title Posted on September 17, 2010 by Michael Ray Hopkin “ We all need to lead where we are planted and shine where we now find ourselves.&# According to Robin Sharma , the author of The Leader Who Had No Title: A Modern Fable on Real Success in Business and in Life , anyone can be a leader. Too many people go to work with the mindset that to be a leader they need to work their way up the company ladder, get the title or position they seek, and then they can be leaders. This is the wrong approach according to Sharma. The book is written in a business fable style. The story is good and somewhat engaging. The leadership principles that surface in the story make the book worth reading. The foundation principle is self-leadership. Anyone who understands this can lead regardless of his or her official title in an organization. According to Sharma, “leaders are those individuals who do the things that failures aren’t willing to do–even though they might not like doing them either.&# Too many people pay the sad costs of mediocrity and forego the spectacular rewards of being a leader. In the story, the main character (Blake) has conversations with four unorthodox leaders. Each of these individuals works in a position that — based on conventional wisdom — would not be considered a leadership position. Each conversation brings out key principles that can help “ordinary&# people become true leaders: You need not title to be a leader: Success (business and personal) is something that’s consciously created. To lead without a title “you will have to be unrealistically persistent and wildly courageous.&# Turbulent times build great leaders: Challenging times in both business and life give us great opportunities to learn and transform ourselves. “Problems and difficult days are actually good for you.&# The deeper your relationships, the stronger your leadership: “Leave every single person who intersects your path better, happier, and more engaged than you found them.&# Time spent forming deep relationships–in all aspects of life–will pay dividends down the road. To be a great leader, first become a great person: Training and strengthening your inner leader will help you perform at extraordinary levels. The key is learning to lead yourself. In our world we define success by the things we have, not by the people we’ve become. The more self-awareness we develop the more likely we are to grow and help others. If you are looking for practical ways to improve your leadership and your ability to make a difference where you’re at now, this book is a must-read. Though I’m not a veteran, I appreciate the thread of gratitude throughout the book for veterans who have served and for the freedoms espoused in America. – The Product Management Perspective: This is a great book for product managers. Too often we agonize over titles and the fact that some people/organizations do not give us the “respect we deserve.&# We have the opportunity to become leaders in our organizations, regardless of the title or the perception of others. Possibly related posts: (automatically generated) Book Review: The Right Leader Don’t hesitate Provide opportunities for success Book Review: The Leader who had no title Filed under: Leadership , Purpose Tagged: | principles , Robin Sharma , self-leadership , success « Speak the language Manager vs. ? » Like Be the first to like this post. Leave a Reply Cancel reply Lead on Purpose Top leadership blogs Blogroll Lead on Purpose: How Product Managers Lead Teams to Success Leadership / Executive Strategy Great Leadership M-Power – Harnessing the Power of the Mind Management Excellence by Art Petty Quantum Leaders Sanborn and Associates Marketing Hubspot Seth Godin Web Ink Now Product Management / Marketing How To Be A Good Product Manager On Product Management Pragmatic Marketing Product Management Tips Product Management Tribe Product Management View Product Marketing Blog Strategic Product Manager The Product Management View The Productologist Tyner Blain z-Alltop Sundry Kirk Weisler – T4D Live on Purpose Radio Twitter Categories Innovation (12) Integrity (33) Knowledge (63) Leadership (206) Learning (60) Market-driven (50) Product Management / Marketing (135) Purpose (64) Speed Reading (2) Team Building (48) Techology (30) Trust (79) Uncategorized (2) Blog at WordPress.com. Theme: Digg 3 Column by WP Designer.

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Great Leaders Make Decisions | N2Growth Blog

N2Growth Blog

Walt Disney, one of the greatest creative talents and true innovators of our time realized the value of action when he said: “The way to get started is to quit talking and begin doing.&# Copyright/Legal Privacy Resources Sitemap N2Growth Blog © Copyright 2010 N2Growth.

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A new Leadership Development Carnival

Lead on Purpose

This first Leadership Development Carnival in 2010 provides links to 50 posts — what Dan calls “the Best of 2009.&#

Leadership & Influence Summit | N2Growth Blog

N2Growth Blog

How about a discussion on what leaders can do to inspire cultural innovation. You make an excellent case for cultural innovation and leadership. link] ATIG Mike, authenticity and transparency for better and ETHICAL business.

StrategyDriven Employee Engagement Podcast

Michael Lee Stallard

Meta Log in Entries RSS Comments RSS WordPress.org Copyright © 2010 Michael Lee Stallard

Human Capital Institute's Employee Engagement Conference

Michael Lee Stallard

Meta Log in Entries RSS Comments RSS WordPress.org Copyright © 2010 Michael Lee Stallard

Leadership & Political Correctness | N2Growth Blog

N2Growth Blog

I don’t know about you, but it’s almost as if we have raised a generation of leaders who feel they have a moral and ethical obligation to be politically correct – WRONG. Copyright/Legal Privacy Resources Sitemap N2Growth Blog © Copyright 2010 N2Growth.

Definition of Leadership | N2Growth Blog

N2Growth Blog

The Ten Commandments and the Sermon on the Mount are all the ethical code anybody needs.&# - Harry S. Copyright/Legal Privacy Resources Sitemap N2Growth Blog © Copyright 2010 N2Growth.

Hundreds of Employee Engagement Ideas

Michael Lee Stallard

1 Comment so far Frode H on July 27th, 2010 David Zinger’s network is amazing. Meta Log in Entries RSS Comments RSS WordPress.org Copyright © 2010 Michael Lee Stallard

Maximize Employee Engagement, Alignment and Productivity

Michael Lee Stallard

Meta Log in Entries RSS Comments RSS WordPress.org Copyright © 2010 Michael Lee Stallard

The Pride Paradox

Michael Lee Stallard

Values such as work ethic, excellence and open-mindedness can be cultivated with practice. Meta Log in Entries RSS Comments RSS WordPress.org Copyright © 2010 Michael Lee Stallard

Get to Know Colleagues' and Customers' Stories

Michael Lee Stallard

3 Comments so far John Halter on November 6th, 2010 Great post! Kevin on November 9th, 2010 Outstanding communication–thanks for sharing. The Employee Factor on November 9th, 2010 [.]

Diversity & Leadership | N2Growth Blog

N2Growth Blog

This blog was recently nominated for Kevin Eikenberry’s Best Leadership Blogs of 2010 , and I noticed recently that Kevin was taking heat from the gender police for having only one woman on the list of nominees. link] Thoughts on the Best of Leadership Blogs 2010 Event [.]

Three practices of successful product managers

Lead on Purpose

Home About the Blog Michael’s Bio Resources Lead on Purpose Entries RSS | Comments RSS Top Posts Lead on Purpose featured Five leadership practices for improving customer service Five factors of leadership Real-world examples of customer service Leadership and Product Management Five stages of problem solving Guest Post: The Yin-Yang of Product Management -- Market Sensing Book Review: The Leader Who had no Title Market sensing Product manager responsibilities Recent Comments Doug Taylor on Guest Post: 10 Secrets of Effective Leaders Michael Ray Hopkin on Ethics and family values Yetta Korwatch on Ethics and family values Essential Pieces for Strategic Product Leadership « Where the Product Management Tribe Gathers on Leadership and Product Management Essential Pieces for Strategic Product Leadership « Where the Product Management Tribe Gathers on Michael’s Bio Archives December 2010 November 2010 October 2010 September 2010 August 2010 July 2010 June 2010 May 2010 April 2010 March 2010 February 2010 January 2010 December 2009 November 2009 October 2009 September 2009 August 2009 July 2009 June 2009 May 2009 April 2009 March 2009 February 2009 January 2009 December 2008 November 2008 October 2008 September 2008 August 2008 July 2008 June 2008 May 2008 April 2008 March 2008 February 2008 January 2008 December 2007 Three practices of successful product managers Posted on November 30, 2010 by Michael Ray Hopkin At the most basic level, a product’s success is measured by how well it sells in the market and the profit it brings to the company. A company’s success is ultimately a roll-up of all products and services selling for a profit. This seems straight forward, and yet in my experience company leaders too often lose track of this important goal. They focus on this marketing campaign or that new technology, and lose track of what’s most important. Granted, sometimes they focus too much on profit at the expense of other important directives, but that’s a topic for another post. In most companies product managers have a lot of products and significant responsibilities. It’s easy for them to get bogged down in the countless tasks that are thrown their way every day. With all the meetings, floods of email, and requirements to manage, the thought of focusing on a product’s profitability can be illusive. It’s not impossible, however. By focusing on three simple, yet powerful, practices, product managers can channel their products toward profitability: Know your market: Get a clear understanding of the market where your products compete, and work diligently to stay in front of new trends and technologies. Make customer calls and customer visits often. Work with the sales team; understand how they sell your products. Know what works. Know the weaknesses of the products (and take action to correct them). Understand why people pay (or don’t pay) for your products. Be the voice of the customer to your company. Provide clear direction: One of the key directives for products managers is to provide clear direction to the engineering/development teams. Good product managers write understandable and timely requirements and prioritize them effectively. They provide solid product design (most effectively with the help of good designers). A key to giving clear direction is for product managers to project their confidence and full support to the work engineering is doing. Earn their trust. Inspire them to do great things, especially when developing your products. Launch successfully: A successful product launch depends on a coordinated launch plan involving many different groups. Product managers are in a unique position to facilitate successful product launches. Start with a tight, focused beta program; learn from the testers and change accordingly. Help product marketing set the proper tone for the launch by understanding the new product’s strengths. Work in tandem with the customer support teams to monitor product acceptance and make changes where necessary. Work with the sales team to make sure they understand the new product and hit the ground running when it releases. After a successful launch, monitor the product’s uptake and financials and make sure it continues to succeed. This, of course, loops back to knowing your market and making sure your product meets the needs of the people in your market. These three practices cover the most important bases for creating successful products. You should plan time to focus on these elements on a daily and weekly basis. If you are in a leadership position in product management, take time to evaluate your team and make sure they are focusing on these key practices that will lead to profitable products. Possibly related posts: (automatically generated) Credit comes later Understand your role Seeds of success What do we really sell? Filed under: Leadership , Market-driven , Product Management / Marketing , Techology , Trust Tagged: | success , confidence , market , product direction , products , profits , product launch , product design « Book Review: It’s Not Just Who You Know Guest Post: The “General&# Manager – Soldier Lessons for the Business Battlefield » Like Be the first to like this post. Leave a Reply Cancel reply Lead on Purpose Top leadership blogs Blogroll Lead on Purpose: How Product Managers Lead Teams to Success Leadership / Executive Strategy Great Leadership M-Power – Harnessing the Power of the Mind Management Excellence by Art Petty Quantum Leaders Sanborn and Associates Marketing Hubspot Seth Godin Web Ink Now Product Management / Marketing How To Be A Good Product Manager On Product Management Pragmatic Marketing Product Management Tips Product Management Tribe Product Management View Product Marketing Blog Strategic Product Manager The Product Management View The Productologist Tyner Blain z-Alltop Sundry Kirk Weisler – T4D Live on Purpose Radio Twitter Categories Innovation (12) Integrity (33) Knowledge (63) Leadership (206) Learning (60) Market-driven (50) Product Management / Marketing (135) Purpose (64) Speed Reading (2) Team Building (48) Techology (30) Trust (79) Uncategorized (2) Blog at WordPress.com. Theme: Digg 3 Column by WP Designer.

John Wooden: What the Obituaries Missed

Michael Lee Stallard

– In Memoriam: John Robert Wooden (1910-2010) 1 Comment so far Curious Cat Management Improvement Blog » Management Improvement Carnival #100 on June 10th, 2010 [.] Meta Log in Entries RSS Comments RSS WordPress.org Copyright © 2010 Michael Lee Stallard

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To Impart Your Values

Michael Lee Stallard

Meta Log in Entries RSS Comments RSS WordPress.org Copyright © 2010 Michael Lee Stallard

Five championship strategies

Lead on Purpose

If my final score is who I want to be — a man or woman of integrity, of honesty, of virtue, of hard work, of ethics — then I can sustain setbacks and difficulties that come.

Real Dysfunction Today, Hidden in Plain Sight

Michael Lee Stallard

Michael Lee Stallard Insights on Leadership and Employee Engagement Home About Hire to Speak Press Kit Real Dysfunction Today, Hidden in Plain Sight Published by Michael Lee Stallard on August 25, 2010 04:42 pm under Uncategorized Many individuals and organizations today are in a funk.

Should CEOs Have Term Limits? | N2Growth Blog

N2Growth Blog

Posted on July 7th, 2010 by admin in Leadership , Operations & Strategy , Rants By Mike Myatt , Chief Strategy Officer, N2growth I have read some interesting articles and blog posts of late on the subject of CEO term limits, and felt this topic worthy of discussion.

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Burnout Results From Living in Conflict with Values

Michael Lee Stallard

4 Comments so far Casey Ross on August 9th, 2010 Hey Michael! Michael Lee Stallard on August 9th, 2010 Hi Casey, Thanks for your comment. Best wishes and warmest regards, Michael Getting in the Autumn Groove | Sylvia Lafair - Elegant Leadership on September 7th, 2010 [.]

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The Anxiety of Learning

Michael Lee Stallard

2 Comments so far Siddhartha Bhattacharjee on July 7th, 2010 A fantastic read,thanks for sharing. Sid Michael Lee Stallard on July 8th, 2010 Sid, Glad you liked the interview. Meta Log in Entries RSS Comments RSS WordPress.org Copyright © 2010 Michael Lee Stallard

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Building Your Brand “Buddy The Elf” Style – Part 2 :: Women on.

Women on Business

If they are feeling your brand understands them and their needs, is innovative, is a good value, and cares about them, they are now ready to jump in and interact with you.

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Serving a Cause Greater than Self

Michael Lee Stallard

Meta Log in Entries RSS Comments RSS WordPress.org Copyright © 2010 Michael Lee Stallard

StrategyDriven Podcast: Employee Engagement

Michael Lee Stallard

Michael Lee Stallard Insights on Leadership and Employee Engagement Home About Hire to Speak Press Kit StrategyDriven Podcast: Employee Engagement Published by Michael Lee Stallard on May 29, 2010 05:49 pm under Uncategorized Recently I was a guest on the StrategyDriven podcast with host Nathan Ives.

Strengthen Your “Critical Connections” at Work

Michael Lee Stallard

Meta Log in Entries RSS Comments RSS WordPress.org Copyright © 2010 Michael Lee Stallard

Trust and credibility

Lead on Purpose

3 Responses The 7 Lesson Series of Attraction Marketing That You Should Not Ignore | Network Marketer Professional , on March 5, 2010 at 11:40 am said: [.] Reply Geoff Snyder , on March 27, 2010 at 12:53 am said: Hi Michael!

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