Creating an Effective Peer Review System

Harvard Business Review

Employee performance reviews are a hot topic once again. Many people think real-time peer reviews will be a key piece of the puzzle. But how do you create, maintain and support a successful real-time peer review program to make sure it delivers on its potential? Another company might choose to emphasize fiscal responsibility, collaboration, or innovation. Peer reviews shouldn’t feel like work.

Who's the Best at Innovating Innovation?

Harvard Business Review

Most companies put innovation at the top of their agendas. But how many devote the energy and resources it takes to build innovation into the values, processes, and practices that rule everyday activity and behavior? Not many, as we argued when we launched the Innovating Innovation Challenge in October. Of course, it's variety and the daring to be different that produces game-changing innovation. Democratize Innovation — For Sustained Innovation Culture.

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How Brigham & Women’s Funds Health Care Innovation

Harvard Business Review

One of the biggest challenges in health care is how to provide innovative, high technology specialty care while reining in costs at the same time. Since 2013, we have tapped our front lines – our 1,500 physicians and thousands more nurses, PA’s, pharmacists and other clinicians – for ways to improve care and reduce costs, using an innovation incubator model that adapts venture capital investment approaches to find and scale the best ideas.

When You Have to Carry Out a Decision You Disagree With

Harvard Business

You might even be tempted to communicate to your peers and supervisees that you’re not convinced this is the right way to go. This is what I did early in my academic career when I received peer review comments on a paper I’d submitted for publication. Without fail, there would be at least one reviewer who hated the paper. When this first started happening, I hated those reviewers and assumed they hadn’t read my paper carefully.

The Countries with the Boldest Business Leaders

Harvard Business

Our leadership development work with organizations has given us a database of 360-degree assessments from over 75,000 business leaders around the world. This accords with other, peer-reviewed research that shows a connection between displaying confidence and being perceived as competent. (If Fortune favors the bold , goes the old Roman saying. Our research suggests fortune is not alone in this: so do the Americans and the Chinese.

Simple Digital Technologies Can Reduce Health Care Costs

Harvard Business

Innovating for Value in Health Care. Digital therapeutics are being increasingly validated in clinical trials published in peer-reviewed medical journals and are available or are being developed for most chronic diseases. An additional 32% of the population has “pre-diabetes” – meaning that they are at high risk of developing diabetes. Digital therapeutics are being developed and clinically validated for smoking cessation.

How Physicians Can Keep Up with the Knowledge Explosion in Medicine

Harvard Business

Innovating for Value in Health Care. One service, called UpToDate , employs 6,300 physician authors, editors, and peer reviewers to manually review the most recent medical information to produce synopses for practicing doctors. With the arrival of more advanced analytics such as IBM Watson , we can imagine more intelligent system such as MD Anderson’s Oncology Expert Advisor that one of us (Lynda) previously developed.

How Leaders Can Help Others Influence Them

Harvard Business

Recently, I was talking with a senior leader from a world-class global learning and development company. But my peer-review literature search revealed no similar ways to assess how willing leaders are to be influenced or how transparent they are about how they can best be influenced. We were discussing his firm’s approach to teaching leadership. He was talking about how to help leaders influence others.

Why the Future of Social Science Is with Private Companies

Harvard Business Review

The Reproducibility Project found it could substantively replicate the results of fewer than 40% of 100 high-profile experiments published in peer-reviewed journals. Tomorrow’s most important discoveries into why people do what they do will most likely come from business innovation than university research. The innovation paradigm shifts from R&D (Research & Development) to E&S (Experiment & Scale).

Morning Advantage: An Ivory Tower. or a Gilded Cage?

Harvard Business Review

In turn, there’s less incentive to perform cross-disciplinary research, which, traditionally, has served as a catalyst for innovation. Most resources go to ideas and techniques (and researchers) that have proven profitable in the past, while it’s harder and harder to get ideas outside the mainstream either accepted by peer review, supported by the university, or funded by granting agencies.". Of course, the private sector is fraught with innovation problems too.

Make Your Knowledge Workers More Productive

Harvard Business Review

Marissa Mayer, Yahoo''s CEO, ended the company''s work-from-home policy to foster a more collaborative, innovative environment. The analyst would then review each law and group them by similar characteristic. At a more micro-level, we saw a team at pharmaceutical company Roche recently experiment with a much simpler expense-claim processing system based around peer review rather than oversight, and again it was a useful way of getting rid of tedious and non-value-added activities.