Trending Sources

Flextime Is Declining, But “Flex Around the Edges” Is Up

Harvard Business Review

Are such “right to request” laws indicators of a rise in flextime? Or do they reflect a fear that flextime programs are being eliminated? Extended flextime, such as job sharing, part-time work, and sabbaticals, is an even stronger employee magnet.

With Flextime, Bosses Prefer Early Birds to Night Owls

Harvard Business Review

Flextime programs have never been more popular than they are today. Their research explored a potential reason for the widely varying outcomes: managers might look upon flextime favorably when they perceive a worker is using it to achieve higher productivity, and unfavorably when they perceive it being used to accommodate personal-life demands. make the case that depending on what the manager attributes the flextime use to, the employee may be either rewarded or penalized.

Interact with Employees and Impact Productivity

Coaching Tip

Gallup also found, in a separate study ( [link] ), that regardless of the number of hours worked, weeks of vacation time or a company''s flextime policy, engaged workers have a higher overall level of well being. A Gallup Poll conducted last year gives credence to what many successful companies have known for years--engaged, involved workers impact a business'' bottom line in a positive manner. . In 2012, Gallup looked at 49,928 businesses or work units and about 1.4

The Year in Management, Told in 20 Charts

Harvard Business Review

Sure, flextime is OK. One of the great pleasures of my job is thinking about, creating, and publishing charts in partnership with our amazing designers. And you all seem to quite like them, too. So as is required among most all digital editors at the end of each calendar year, I’ve gone through the entirety of 2014’s charts, tables, and other visuals we’ve published for HBR.org – hundreds in all – to highlight 20 that tell particularly interesting stories.

Just Because You’re Happy Doesn’t Mean You’re Not Burned Out

Harvard Business Review

Employers don’t necessarily have to institute formal programs to allow for telecommuting or flextime. A new survey report just published by Staples Advantage offers a paradoxical set of findings about US office workers. Overwhelmingly, they are happy.

Experiment with Organizational Change Before Going All In

Harvard Business Review

Maybe you were contemplating a change in employment policies such as flextime or one in customer-facing processes such as a new billing system. Think about the last time you considered introducing a significant change in your enterprise with the intention of improving organizational effectiveness. You likely studied the proposed change in detail, discussed it at length with relevant colleagues, came up with a strategy for implementing it, and then introduced it.

Give Your Organization a Work-Life Vision

Harvard Business Review

Culture is what really defines how much latitude people have in terms of managing their work and non-work demands, whether or not there’s a flextime policy on the books. More and more companies are acknowledging the importance of work-life balance, at least as far as official policy goes.

How to Be a Family-Friendly Boss

Harvard Business Review

Moreover, when HR does institutionalize formal “work-life” programs like formal flextime or telecommuting, the effect is often to produce negative consequences for those using them.) I have a friend who is an ascending executive at an international financial firm. His career has always been demanding- long hours, lots of travel, ultra-high performance standards (which he always has met or exceeded).

The One Thing About Your Spouse’s Personality That Really Affects Your Career

Harvard Business Review

Here’s something that’s obvious, but at the same time not: We’re all a lot more than we appear to be at work. We have other dimensions that are invisible to our companies, supervisors, direct reports, and most of our colleagues, and those invisible dimensions have a deep impact on our work.

Proof That Positive Work Cultures Are More Productive

Harvard Business Review

A Gallup poll showed that, even when workplaces offered benefits such as flextime and work-from-home opportunities, engagement predicted wellbeing above and beyond anything else.

The One Thing About Your Spouse’s Personality That Really Affects Your Career

Harvard Business Review

Here’s something that’s obvious, but at the same time not: We’re all a lot more than we appear to be at work. We have other dimensions that are invisible to our companies, supervisors, direct reports, and most of our colleagues, and those invisible dimensions have a deep impact on our work.

What About Working Fathers?

Harvard Business Review

The studies showed that fathers tend to use informal workarounds to spend more time with their kids; they should instead be encouraged to use formal ones, including flextime, telecommuting and compressed work weeks.

Getting Japanese Women Back on Track

Harvard Business Review

Flextime and programmatic help would help ease the burden. While the power shortages in the wake of the earthquake and tsunami caused many companies to encourage employees to work from home, the overwhelming pressure to stay as late as one's peers means that "face time" will continue to trump flextime, and well-qualified Japanese women will pay the price.

Be Flexible, Attract Talent

Marshall Goldsmith

So what are some of the best practices around flexible work and flextime? In this time of economic uncertainty, the pressure to control costs is at a peak. With hiring freezes and layoffs, companies increasingly are asking themselves how to produce the results they need with limited or decreasing human resources. One innovative firm in the Bay Area, Flexperience, has created a different talent market: experienced professionals who seek flexible work opportunities.

How to Keep a Job Search Discreet

Harvard Business Review

He started interviewing, taking flextime to travel to the meetings. Looking for a job while you already have one can be stressful, especially in the age of social media when privacy is scarce. You don't want to rock the boat at your current company but you want to find the next great opportunity. Should you tell your boss you're looking? How do you handle references? If you get an offer, is two weeks notice really enough?

Elder Care, Child Care, and the Struggles of Chinese Women

Harvard Business Review

Among the suggestions and solutions aired by conference attendees: Flextime is still relatively unknown in China. One way to remove the stigma associated with flexible work arrangements, suggests Rosalind Hudnell, Chief Diversity Office Director for Intel , is to detach it from working mothers and telecommuters, and apply "intermittent flextime" that could apply as much to someone whose job entails late-night telephone calls to California as to someone dealing with ailing elders.

The One Thing About Your Spouse’s Personality That Really Affects Your Career

Harvard Business Review

Here’s something that’s obvious, but at the same time not: We’re all a lot more than we appear to be at work. We have other dimensions that are invisible to our companies, supervisors, direct reports, and most of our colleagues, and those invisible dimensions have a deep impact on our work.

Microfinance Is Good for Women, but It's Only Part of the Solution

Harvard Business Review

Many companies also need to adopt more progressive policies regarding flextime, career stops, job sharing, and other alternative career paths. Ellen Kullman (DuPont), Maria das Graças Silva Foster (Petrobras), and Chua Sock Koong (Singapore Telecommunications) lead three of the most powerful companies in the world. These women, like many other great leaders, got there by working their way up the ladder — not by founding entrepreneurial ventures.