2016 May Be Your Year For A New Career

Lead Change Blog

Usually we choose our jobs or professional roles as we listen to other voices: “I need to pay the bills.” What if 2016 is your year for a new career? New Career Skills. Fearless exploring is the most important new-career skill you can have.

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43 Best Leadership Books to Skyrocket Your Career

Miles Anthony Smith

Do Leadership Books Really Help Advance Your Life and Career? Even if you manage to find what appears to be solid leadership advice, does it actually help you advance your career and become a better leader? Career Leadership

6 Ways For A Leader To Fill A Workplace With People Who Love Their Jobs

Terry Starbucker

In my never-ending quest for more human leadership , I’ve discovered an essential truth: If you encounter a workplace filled with people who love their jobs, you’ll find a great leader who made that happen. It takes more human leadership.

Old Brands. New Hands. Last Stands | In the CEO Afterlife

In the CEO Afterlife

I realize I’ve been around a long time whenever I reminisce about the brands I was associated with in my early career. But our basic human problems are pretty much the same. Human Resources. In the CEO Afterlife. Main menu Home. Leadership. Branding. Old Brands. New Hands.

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Another Way You Can Get Recognition Right

Lead Change Blog

The need to be seen is very human. Just check David Rock’s work about human needs in social interactions. If we apply his model, we can connect the need to be seen to our need as humans for status and relatedness. Recognition is a tricky thing.

It’s called human resources for a reason

ReImagine Work

It was a great day when the personnel department changed the name on the door to human resources. Why I became an advocate of human beings at work. About 7 years into my IT career I realized I didn’t love the technology enough to excel over the long haul.

Old Brands. New Hands. Last Stands | In the CEO Afterlife

In the CEO Afterlife

I realize I’ve been around a long time whenever I reminisce about the brands I was associated with in my early career. But our basic human problems are pretty much the same. Human Resources. In the CEO Afterlife. Main menu Home. Leadership. Branding. Old Brands. New Hands.

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This is Why People Really Quit Their Jobs

Lead from Within

When you care about your employees’ happiness and success, in their career and in life, they end up with a better job and you end up with an energized team. The One Quality Every Leader Needs To Succee d.

Featured Leading Voice: Mary Schaefer

Lead Change Blog

Mary’s mission is to create work cultures where organizations and human beings can both thrive. in Human Resource Management from the University of Charleston. Mary has always been fascinated by the human dynamic at work.

The ?M? Word: A Company's Most Underrated Intangible | In the CEO.

In the CEO Afterlife

by John • November 30, 2011 • Human Resources , Leadership , Life , Marketing , Strategy • 0 Comments. Early in my career, I swam in four years of red ink at Jacobs Suchard ’s Canadian subsidiary. Human Resources. In the CEO Afterlife. Main menu Home. Leadership.

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Gretzky, Gates, Zuckerberg: Can they see the Unseen? | In the CEO.

In the CEO Afterlife

That is, the ability to move performance into the extraordinary needed at least 10,000 hours of practice. I’ll bet everyone you mentioned in your post at some point in their career developed their entrepeneurial ability to be were the puck was headed by out working most mere mortals.

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Corporate Leaders: What Will Be Your Epitaph? | In the CEO Afterlife

In the CEO Afterlife

by John • October 3, 2011 • Human Resources , Leadership , Life • 0 Comments. Over his highly successful career, Mr. Bighead created hundreds of millions in shareholder value by acquiring, downsizing and selling companies. Human Resources. In the CEO Afterlife.

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Frontline Festival: February 2016

Let's Grow Leaders

Chantal Bechervaise of Take It Personel-ly reminds us that when there’s a lack of morale, everyone becomes less productive and are not as good at communicating with each other as they need to be. The business of business is relationships; the business of life is human connection.

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Business Proverbs and BS | In the CEO Afterlife

In the CEO Afterlife

by John • September 26, 2011 • Human Resources , Leadership • 3 Comments. But I’ll gladly tell you that the following proverbs need challenging: 1. Human Resources. In the CEO Afterlife. Main menu Home. Leadership. Branding. Business Proverbs and BS.

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Pursuing Entrepreneurial Companies: Grad Advice | In the CEO.

In the CEO Afterlife

by John • April 11, 2011 • Human Resources , Strategy • 0 Comments. To ‘entrepreneurs in waiting’ who want to begin their careers in a corporation, I suggest the following: 1. Human Resources. In the CEO Afterlife. Main menu Home. Leadership. Branding.

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Do Vulture Cultures still prevail in Business? | In the CEO Afterlife

In the CEO Afterlife

by John • May 2, 2011 • Human Resources , Leadership • 1 Comment. I witnessed plenty of vulture culture during my career. No need to bother with the bottom line. Human Resources. Tags: Culture , Human Resources , Leadership. In the CEO Afterlife.

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Has SAS Institute’s Goodnight Cracked the Code on Corporate Culture?

Michael Lee Stallard

Earlier in his career when he worked for a NASA subcontractor on the Apollo program, he observed the dismal environment of employees working in cubicle farms and how it contributed to annual employee turnover of around 50 percent.

If You Want to Be Happy at Work, Have a Life Outside of It

Harvard Business Review

Moreover, many of us today expand the role of work beyond just earning a living and expect our careers to provide opportunities for personal growth and fulfillment. With more of us wanting and expecting our jobs to provide not just a paycheck but also human needs like learning, community, and a sense of purpose, we wanted to know what specifically makes people happy at work. A clear career path? Work-life balance Career planning Psychology Digital Article

Branding the Aspiring Novelist | In the CEO Afterlife

In the CEO Afterlife

A literary agent would look more favorably at a book on the workings of the human brain from a notable brain researcher than from John Bell. But as a unique ingredient to a human interest story about a retired grey-hair finding contentment in words, there’s a spark of intrigue.

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Why Even AI-Powered Factories Will Have Jobs for Humans

Harvard Business Review

Dubbed the “Alien Dreadnought,” Tesla’s new manufacturing facility in Fremont, California, was designed to be fully automated — no humans need apply. The company has also hired hundreds of workers to revamp production processes, train (and retrain) the robots, and swap them out when needed, among other tasks. Humans are underrated.” Adding Humans to the Mix. As such, many companies are trying to grow the talent they need in-house.

Has Jim Goodnight Cracked the Code of Corporate Culture?

Michael Lee Stallard

Earlier in his career when he worked for a NASA subcontractor on the Apollo program, he observed the dismal environment of employees working in cubicle farms and how it contributed to annual employee turnover of around 50 percent.

Review of “Still Surprised: A Memoir of a Life in Leadership” by Warren Bennis

The Practical Leader

Warren has a long and very distinguished career. The next year (1948) Douglas McGregor (best remembered for The Human Side of Enterprise and its description of leadership approaches Theory X and Theory Y) became Antioch’s president.

Algorithms Won’t Replace Managers, But Will Change Everything About What They Do

Harvard Business Review

WF: What do you see as the main career lessons of the book? It comes down to just communicating with other human beings. TC: In any company, you need someone to manage the others, and management is a very hard skill. What skills keep that human from being replaced?

5 Ways To Build Trust (Lessons from a Conversation)

QAspire

If you want to be trusted, you first need to be respected. As a leader, when you are engaged to build a team and make a difference, you need to carefully examine your own behavior. Otherwise they may trust you just fine but not feel they need to work with you.

Setting Expectations On Behaviors You Value: 5 Pointers

QAspire

“Strategic Reward&# as referred here is not just “carrot and stick&# - but the idea was to map the intrinsic human need to be validated/appreciated with managing expectation.

“Trust Me, I’m a Leader”: Why Building a Culture of Trust Will Boost Employee Performance – and Maybe Even Save Your Company

Strategy Driven

Unusually Excellent is a back-to-basics reference book that offers both seasoned and aspiring leaders a framework for understanding and a guide for applying the battle-tested fundamentals of leadership at every stage of their careers. Feeling safe is a primal human need.

“Trust Me, I’m a Leader”: Why Building a Culture of Trust Will Boost Employee Performance – and Maybe Even Save Your Company

Strategy Driven

Unusually Excellent is a back-to-basics reference book that offers both seasoned and aspiring leaders a framework for understanding and a guide for applying the battle-tested fundamentals of leadership at every stage of their careers. Feeling safe is a primal human need.

Rejection Is Critical for Success

Harvard Business Review

Our basic human need to belong causes these incidents to stick with us through the years. Even as adults, at various times in our careers we're not selected for jobs , promotions, or projects; or even less significant benefits such as parking spaces, preferred offices, or new computer equipment. A few people refused to accept the new standards, arguing their unique needs for privacy, space, and administrative support. How has rejection helped or hindered your career?

Make Sure Your Employees’ Emotional Needs Are Met

Harvard Business Review

In the early 1940s, Abraham Maslow started asking questions about human motivation— questions I study, too. In 1943, he published his first article on a theory he called the Hierarchy of Needs. At the bottom are physiological needs : food and water. The next levels represent safety needs , then love needs , then esteem needs. In today’s developed-world workplace, physiological and safety needs are, for the most part, already met.

How GE Is Attracting, Developing, and Retaining Global Talent

Harvard Business Review

Anticipating their needs is one of the great tasks of leadership development and an area of sustained inquiry at GE. Creating a personalized suite of benefits, providing greater flexibility and choice to better meet the needs of a global, diverse workforce. Enhancing our performance-management system with new tools to help employees navigate their career at GE and identify a wider range of opportunities across the company.

To Overcome Your Insecurity, Recognize Where It Really Comes From

Harvard Business Review

They both had solid records and promising career prospects, and yet they felt that something was not working. That is all well and good until you realize that, throughout life, we need loving others in order to be healthy, independent people. Belonging is as fundamental a human need as autonomy. To accept and overcome insecurity, we rather need to stop caring too much about each other and start to care more for each other, and for the place we work in.

When Burnout Is a Sign You Should Leave Your Job

Harvard Business Review

This is my own personal declaration of human rights at work. It informs everything I do as a coach, management professor, and human being. I came to realize that even though leaving my job might entail a major career change and an unwelcome relocation, my well-being depended on it. Persistent barriers to good performance thwart the human need for mastery. When fit is bad, on the other hand, you probably won’t receive the support you need to perform well.

To Get Honest Feedback, Leaders Need to Ask

Harvard Business Review

The (feedback) process strikes at the tension between two core human needs — the need to learn and grow, and the need to be accepted just the way you are. To stay honest with yourself, you need “loving critics.”

The No. 1 Enemy of Creativity: Fear of Failure

Harvard Business Review

So, you act like an anthropologist to understand human needs and problems before jumping to solutions. Most of us in business, if we need to discover how to do something new, use PowerPoint or Excel spreadsheets to rationalize our approach.

If You’re Feeling Unappreciated, Give Someone Else Credit

Harvard Business Review

The reality that people like and need to be appreciated seems so intuitively obvious that one can only scratch one’s head and wonder why is doesn’t happen more often. It’s a fundamental human need to feel valued by people we esteem, especially by family members. Given the demands of many careers today – intellectual, physical, and emotional – and the difficulty of expressing appreciation, you may be particularly vulnerable to feeling under-appreciated at work.